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Category: Profile of the Day

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumbAs we continue our exploration of the events leading up to the December 7, 1941 attack, by air, of Pearl Harbor and shore facilities by the Japanese Navy flyers. This attack arose as a result of Japan’s need for raw resources, especially oil, and the sanctions placed upon Japan for its invasion of the China Mainland and the Indochina peninsula. Not only were preparation made on the diplomatic front, but plans were in place to simultaneously attack the United State’s military facilities on Hawaii along with the British and French holdings throughout East Asia.

USS_California_sinking-Pearl_Harbor

During the months leading up to these coordinated attacks in December, the Japanese military had their observers gathering information about the naval movements in Pearl Harbor and aircraft resources across the Hawaiian Islands. Concurrently, a major naval task force was assembled in the Japanese home islands. This included aircraft carriers, battleships, cruisers, destroyers, and associated support vessels. This task force would launch the fighter planes, torpedo planes, and dive bombers that would rain destruction upon our naval forces anchored in the bay at Pearl Harbor. Fortunately, our aircraft carriers were on maneuvers outside of Pearl on that fateful morning.

But, I’m getting ahead of myself. This task force set sail from Japan in the latter part of November and were in position for the attack on that fateful Sunday morning. We will deal with those events in the coming days.

Now, we need to proceed with our exploration of the Japanese preparations and major players that planned this effective attack on our forces in Hawaii on December 7th… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4207 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Pearl Harbor:

    

“Gentlemen, we have just kicked a rabid dog.”
— Isoroku Yamamoto

“I can run wild for six months … after that, I have no expectation of success…”
— Isoroku Yamamoto

“The fate of the Empire rests on this enterprise every man must devote himself totally to the task in hand.”
— Isoroku Yamamoto

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb

On the eve of that memorial day so long ago, we examine some of the reasons for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that Sunday morning of 1941. The U.S. Navy was seemingly unprepared for the attack. The negotiations with the Japanese Embassy in Washington, D.C., had not been completed at the time of the attack, and there was a seemingly sequence of miscommunications between the military leaders in D.C. and Hawaii. All-in-all, The U.S. was unprepared for an air attack at Pearl Harbor.

USS_Nevada_attempts_escape_from_Pearl_80G32558

The Japanese, on the other hand, were driven by both their territorial ambitions and their quest for raw resources. These two drives prompted the military leaders to plan to attack on the Navy’s Pacific fleet in Pearl Harbor. Spies were in place in Honolulu. A task force with four carriers were making their way to the islands. All was set for the attack on the morning of December 7th.

But beyond these two obvious reasons, we find that the general culture of militarism in Japan also placed an important role. The leaders of the Japanese government were tied closely to this warrior tradition. This same mindset of militarism would later spawn the Kamikaze pilots who were willing to give their lives in the defense of their homeland.

On the American side, the ambivalent tradition of isolationism within the American Congress resulted in substantial unpreparedness. Communication was misunderstood, instruction to guard the harbor and land bases in the tropical paradise that was the Hawaiian Islands resulted in a generalized fear of spies among the Japanese Americans living in Honolulu resulted in the ships and planes being grouped together in such a manner as to facilitate the mass destruction that resulted from the attack. The one bright spot was the fact that the aircraft carriers being out to sea rather than in the harbor that fateful morning.  

But enough of these preliminaries. Let’s begin our exploration of these critical event in our nation’s history…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4364 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Pearl Harbor:

    

“I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.”
— Isoroku Yamamoto

“After Barbarossa and Pearl Harbor, the war tide slowly turned against the Axis.”
— Alexander Dubcek

“As costly as it was in the lives of our men and women in uniform, in military assets, and in esteem and pride, Pearl Harbor was a watershed moment for America.”
— Joe Baca

continue reading…

    

I have been hospital for the last week plus and had surgery on Thursday. I will continue my postings after I recovery. Thank you for your understanding.

Gerald Boerner

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

     
Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3856 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

     

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

[ Part 2 of 2 — Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3 ]

    

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3760 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     
Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

[ Part 1 of 2 — Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3 ]
    

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3775 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2977 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3619 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3285 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 33937 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…