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Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.

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Category: English Version
by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will wrap-up those men who have been identified by historians as Founding Fathers; in our previous postings, we have selected a few who filled important functions in the nation-building process, but others were also involved. Looking at these men as a group shows how broad a spectrum of the population was involved in the Revolution against the British.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 10 of 10. ]

[ 4121 Words ]

    

“Government is necessary for our survival. We need government in order to survive. The Founding Fathers created a special place for government. It is called the Constitution.”
— Michael Badnarik

“Maintaining checks and balances on the power of the Judiciary Branch and the other two branches is vital to keep the form of government set up by our Founding Fathers.”
— Todd Tiahrt

“Our Founding Fathers crafted a constitutional Republic for the first time in the history of the world because they were shaping a form of government that would not have the failures of a democracy in it, but had the representation of democracy in it.”
— Steve King

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that writer, idealist, diplomat, and politician — Thomas Jefferson. Not only was he the chief author of the Declaration of Independence, but he defined the function of the State Department, served as the third President of the U.S., and the leader of the Jeffersonian-Republican party.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 9 of 10. ]

[ 3887 Words ]

    

“Our political differences, now matter how sharply they are debated, are really quite narrow in comparison to the remarkably durable national consensus on our founding convictions.”
— John McCain

“We grew up founding our dreams on the infinite promise of American advertising. I still believe that one can learn to play the piano by mail and that mud will give you a perfect complexion.”
— Zelda Fitzgerald

“What has made America great have been the opportunities given to everyone in this country. Since our founding, individuals and families have come to America to seek freedom, opportunity and the choice for a better life.”
— Cathy McMorris

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that American military leader, commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, and first President of this country, George Washington.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 8 of 10. ]

[ 3710 Words ]

    

“Thousands of present day students, like many of our Founding Fathers, are being taught at home.”
— Ernest Istook

“We believe that an Iraqi founding national assembly, freely elected, must decide the future of Iraq.”
— Jalal Talabani

“Two hundred years ago, our Founding Fathers gave us a democracy. It was based upon the simple, yet noble, idea that government derives its validity from the consent of the governed.”
— Paul Tsongas

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that American “Renaissance Man” who was a scientist, scholar, printer, diplomat, and general “grandfather” type, Benjamin Franklin.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 7 of 10. ]

[ 3675 Words ]

    

“The Founding Fathers would be sorry to see that America had become so divided and factionalized.”
— Michael Beschloss

“The founding fathers were not only brilliant, they were system builders and systematic thinkers. They came up with comprehensive plans and visions.”
— Ron Chernow

“The myth that the founding of American Republic was based on the philosophy of John Locke could only have been maintained, because the history of Leibniz’s influence was suppressed.”
— Robert Trout

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that crusader for the adoption of the Constitution and writer of the Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 6 of 10. ]

[ 3392 Words ]

    

“Since its founding in 1854, Penn State has proven to be a leading institution of higher learning.”
— Tim Holden

“The fact is, almost every year since the founding of these United States, our government has lived beyond its means.”
— Paul Gillmor

“The Founding Fathers gave the free press the protection it must have to bare the secrets of government and inform the people.”
— Hugo Black

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that great diplomat and future President, John Adams.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 5 of 10. ]

[ 3037 Words ]

    

“Our Founding Fathers would be proud of all that America has achieved, and will continue to achieve, in the coming years.”
— John Linder

“Second, marriage is an issue that our Founding Fathers wisely left to the states.”
— Judy Biggert

“Our political differences, now matter how sharply they are debated, are really quite narrow in comparison to the remarkably durable national consensus on our founding convictions.”
— John McCain

continue reading…

by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that great propagandist and pamphleteer who made critical contributions in communicating the goals of the revolution to the general populace — Thomas Paine.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 4 of 10. ]

[ 3055 Words ]

    

“In the summer of 1776 our Founding Fathers sought to secure our independence and the liberties that remain the foundation of our nation today.”
— Doc Hastings

“Maintaining checks and balances on the power of the Judiciary Branch and the other two branches is vital to keep the form of government set up by our Founding Fathers.”
— Todd Tiahrt

“Most Americans aren’t the sort of citizens the Founding Fathers expected; they are contented serfs. Far from being active critics of government, they assume that its might makes it right.”
— Joseph Sobran

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that great orator and one of the primary advocates for a “Bill of Rights” to be included in the U.S. Constitution.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 3 of 10. ]

[ 2788 Words ]

    

“I see happiness as a by-product. I don’t think you can pursue happiness. I think that phrase is one of the very few mistakes the Founding Fathers made.”
— James Hillman

“I was on a founding members of the Canadian theatre movement in the late 60’s till the mid 70’s and performed theatre from Halifax to Vancouver and all places in between.”
— Nick Mancuso

“In another situation, and in an active station in life, I should have been keenly occupied, and the founding of an order would have never come into my head.”
— Adam Weihaupt

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. But to get our exploration started, we need to look at the philosophical underpinnings and writings that fueled the American Revolution occurred.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 2 of 10. ]

[ 2243 Words ]

    

“Government is necessary for our survival. We need government in order to survive. The Founding Fathers created a special place for government. It is called the Constitution.”
— Michael Badnarik

“Hey, our Founding Fathers wore long hair and powdered wigs – I don’t see anybody trying to look like them today, either… But we do look to them as role models.”
— Leigh Steinberg

“I see happiness as a by-product. I don’t think you can pursue happiness. I think that phrase is one of the very few mistakes the Founding Fathers made.”
— James Hillman

continue reading…

by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. But to get our exploration started, we need to look at the context within which the American Revolution occurred and a perspective on the philosophical foundations of this revolution.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century.  GLB

[ This is Part 1 of 10. ]

[ 2445 Words ]

    

“Congress is functioning the way the Founding Fathers intended-not very well. They understood that if you move too quickly, our democracy will be less responsible to the majority.”
— Barbara B. Conable, Jr.

“Don’t tire yourself more than need be, even at the price of founding a culture on the fatigue of your bones.”
— Antonin Artaud

“Equality, rightly understood as our founding fathers understood it, leads to liberty and to the emancipation of creative differences; wrongly understood, as it has been so tragically in our time, it leads first to conformity and then to despotism.”
— Barry Goldwater

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