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Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.

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Category: Photography

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1946 Words ]
    

    
Artist’s Quote of the Day…

Artist: Charles Baudelaire

Quote:
“From that moment onwards, our loathsome society rushed, like Narcissus, to contemplate its trivial image on a metallic plate. A form of lunacy, an extraordinary fanaticism took hold of these new sun-worshippers.”

Short Bio Statement: Charles Baudelaire, a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator; Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=7335

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Baudelaire_cropCharles Pierre Baudelaire (1821 – 1867) was a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator. A controversial figure in his lifetime, Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence. At the same time his works, in particular his book of poetry Les fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), have been acknowledged as classics of French literature.
 
Baudelaire was educated in Lyon, where he was forced to board away from his mother (even during holidays) and accept his stepfather’s rigid methods, which included depriving him of visits home when his grades slipped. He wrote when recalling those times: “A shudder at the grim years of claustration […] the unease of wretched and abandoned childhood, the hatred of tyrannical schoolfellows, and the solitude of the heart.” Baudelaire at fourteen was described by a classmate: “He was much more refined and distinguished than any of our fellow pupils […] we are bound to one another[…] by shared tastes and sympathies, the precocious love of fine works of literature”. Later, he attended the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris. Baudelaire was erratic in his studies, at times diligent, at other times prone to “idleness.”
 
At eighteen, Baudelaire was described as “an exalted character, sometimes full of mysticism, and sometimes full of immorality and cynicism (which were excessive but only verbal).” Upon gaining his degree in 1839, he was undecided about his future. He told his brother “I don’t feel I have a vocation for anything.” His stepfather had in mind a career in law or diplomacy, but instead Baudelaire decided to embark upon a literary career, and for the next two years led an irregular life, socializing with other bohemian artists and writers.
 
Baudelaire began to frequent prostitutes and may have contracted gonorrhea and syphilis during this period. He went to a pharmacist known for venereal disease treatments, on recommendation of his older brother Alphonse, a magistrate. For a while, he took on a prostitute named Sara as his mistress and lived with his brother when his funds were low. His stepfather kept him on a tight allowance which he spent as quickly as he received it. Baudelaire began to run up debts, mostly for clothes. His stepfather demanded an accounting and wrote to Alphonse: “The moment has come when something must be done to save your brother from absolute perdition.” In the hope of reforming him and making a man of him, his stepfather sent him on a voyage to Calcutta, India in 1841, under the care of a former naval captain. Baudelaire’s mother was distressed both by his poor behavior and by the proposed solution.  (Wikipedia)

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Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1291 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: David Bailey

Quote:
“It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter, because you can invent things. But in photography everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the ordinary.”

Short Bio Statement: David Bailey, an English photographer who helped create the ‘Swinging London’ of the 1960s…

For more information, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bailey_(photographer)

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

David Bailey_PhotographerDavid Royston Bailey CBE (born 2 January 1938) is an English photographer. Bailey developed a love of natural history, and this led him into photography. Suffering from undiagnosed dyslexia, he experienced problems at school. He attended a private school, Clark’s College in Ilford, where he says they taught him less than the more basic council school. As well as dyslexia he also has the motor skill disorder dyspraxia.

In 1959 he became a photographic assistant at the John French studio, and in May 1960, he was a photographer for John Cole’s Studio Five before being contracted as a fashion photographer for British Vogue magazine later that year. He also undertook a large amount of freelance work.
 
Along with Terence Donovan and Brian Duffy, he captured and helped create the ‘Swinging London’ of the 1960s: a culture of high fashion and celebrity chic. The three photographers socialized with actors, musicians and royalty, and found themselves elevated to celebrity status. Together, they were the first real celebrity photographers, named by Norman Parkinson as "the Black Trinity".
 
The film Blowup (1966), directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, concerns the work and sexual habits of a London fashion photographer played by David Hemmings and is largely based on Bailey.
 
The "Swinging London" scene was aptly reflected in his Box of Pin-Ups (1964): a box of poster-prints of 1960s celebrities and socialites including Terence Stamp, The Beatles, Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, PJ Proby, Cecil Beaton, Rudolf Nureyev, Andy Warhol and notorious East End gangsters the Kray twins.
 
The box was an unusual and unique commercial release, and it reflected the changing status of the photographer that one could sell a collection of prints in this way. (The strong objection to the presence of the Krays on the part of fellow photographer Lord Snowdon was the major reason no American edition of the "Box" ever appeared, nor a British second edition issued.) The record sale for a copy of ‘Box of Pin-Ups’ is reported as "north of £20,000".
 
Bailey’s ascent at Vogue was meteoric. Within months he was shooting covers and at the height of his productivity he shot 800 pages of Vogue editorial in one year. Penelope Tree, a former girlfriend, described him as "the king lion on the Savannah: incredibly attractive, with a dangerous vibe. He was the electricity, the brightest, most powerful, most talented, most energetic force at the magazine".
 
American Vogue’s creative director Grace Coddington, then a model herself said "It was the Sixties, it was a raving time, and Bailey was unbelievably good-looking. He was everything that you wanted him to be – like the Beatles but accessible – and when he went on the market everyone went in. We were all killing ourselves to be his model, although he hooked up with Jean Shrimpton pretty quickly".  (Wikipedia)

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Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1094 Words ]
    

    

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Paul Strand

Quote:
“Honesty no less than intensity of vision is the prerequisite of a living expression. This means a real respect for the thing in front of… the photographer… this is accomplished without tricks of process or manipulation through the use of straight photographic methods…”

Short Bio Statement: Paul Strand, an American photographer and filmmaker who helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=2329

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Paul Strand PortraitPaul Strand was an American photographer and filmmaker who, along with fellow modernist photographers like Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston, helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century. His diverse body of work, spanning six decades, covers numerous genres and subjects throughout the Americas, Europe and Africa.
 
Born in New York City to Bohemian parents, in his late teens Strand was a student of renowned documentary photographer Lewis Hine at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. It was while on a fieldtrip in this class that Strand first visited the 291 art gallery – operated by Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – where exhibitions of work by forward-thinking modernist photographers and painters would move Strand to take his photographic hobby more seriously. Stieglitz would later promote Strand’s work in the 291 gallery itself, in his photography publication Camera Work, and in his artwork in the Hieninglatzing studio.

Some of this early work, like the well-known "Wall Street," experimented with formal abstractions (influencing, among others, Edward Hopper and his idiosyncratic urban vision). Other of Strand’s works reflect his interest in using the camera as a tool for social reform. He was one of the founders of the Photo League, an association of photographers who advocated using their art to promote social and political causes.  (Wikipedia)

Strand subsequently traveled to Mexico, where he photographed the landscape, architecture, folk art, and people and in 1934 produced a film about fishermen for the Mexican government. Thirteen years earlier he had collaborated with Charles Sheeler on a film, Manhatta, a study of the urban high-rise environment. Having returned to New York late in 1934, Strand devoted his energies to theater and filmmaking cooperatives.

In 1943 Strand resumed his still photography, focusing on the people and surroundings of New England. In the early 1950s he moved to Europe, spending six weeks in the northern Italian agrarian community of Luzzara and later traveling to the Outer Hebrides, islands off the northwest coast of Scotland. He traveled and photographed in North and West Africa in the 1960s.  (Getty Museum)

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Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb[2]Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

[ 1293 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Sebastião Salgado

Quote:
“Most of the information we now get is through television and is mutilated. Photography offers the opportunity to spend much more time on a topic. It’s relatively cheaper medium, and can allow a photographer really to live in another place, show another reality, get closer to the truth.”

Short Bio Statement: Sebastião Salgado, a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=3474

Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Sebastião Salgado is a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist. It’s not just that this celebrated Brazilian photojournalist has been sniffling since he arrived in the city, explaining: “I was born in a tropical ecosystem. I’m not used to these plants.” It’s also that he peppers his description of the city with words like strange and crazy, noting that he was mesmerized by the sight of the endless stream of automobile traffic as his plane made its descent.

After a somewhat itinerant childhood, Salgado initially trained as an economist, earning a master’s degree in economics from the University of São Paulo in Brazil. He began work as an economist for the International Coffee Organization, often traveling to Africa on missions for the World Bank, when he first started seriously taking photographs. He travelled often to Africa on missions affiliated with the World Bank. It was then that he first began taking his first photographs. On his return to London these images began to preoccupy him, and he abandoned his career as an economist. At the beginning of 1973 he and his wife returned to Paris so that he could begin his life as a photographer.

Salgado initially worked with the Paris based agency Gamma, but in 1979 he joined the international cooperative of photographers Magnum Photos. He left Magnum in 1994 and formed his own agency, Amazonas Images, in Paris to represent his work. He is particularly noted for his social documentary photography of workers in less developed nations. Longtime gallery director Hal Gould considers Salgado to be the most important photographer of the early century, and gave him his first show in the United States.

Salgado works on long term, self-assigned projects many of which have been published as books: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers, and Migrations. The latter two are mammoth collections with hundreds of images each from all around the world. His most famous pictures are of a gold mine in Brazil called Serra Pelada. He is presently working on a project called Genesis, photographing the landscape, flora and fauna of places on earth that have not been taken over by man.

In September and October 2007, Salgado displayed his photographs of coffee workers from India, Guatemala, Ethiopia and Brazil at the Brazilian Embassy in London. The aim of the project was to raise public awareness of the origins of the popular drink. (Wikipedia)

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Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1159 Words ]
    

    

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Harry Callahan

Quote:     
“I do believe strongly in photography and hope by following it intuitively that when the photographs are looked at they will touch the spirit in people.”

Short Bio Statement: Harry Callahan, an American photographer who is considered one of the great innovators of modern American photography…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=5445

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Harry Morey Callahan (1912 – 1999) was an American photographer who is considered one of the great innovators of modern American photography. He was born in Detroit, Michigan and started photographing in 1938 as an autodidact. By 1946, he was appointed by László Moholy-Nagy to teach photography at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Callahan retired in 1977, at which time he was teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design.
 
Callahan left almost no written records–no diaries, letters, scrapbooks or teaching notes. His technical photographic method was to go out almost every morning, walk the city he lived in and take numerous pictures. He then spent almost every afternoon making proof prints of that day’s best negatives. Yet, for all his photographic activity, Callahan, at his own estimation, produced no more than half a dozen final images a year.
 
He photographed his wife, Eleanor, and daughter, Barbara, and the streets, scenes and buildings of cities where he lived, showing a strong sense of line and form, and light and darkness. He also worked with multiple exposures. Callahan’s work was a deeply personal response to his own life. He was well known to encourage his students to turn their cameras on their lives, and he led by example. Callahan photographed his wife over a period of fifteen years, as his prime subject. Eleanor was essential to his art from 1947 to 1960. He photographed her everywhere – at home, in the city streets, in the landscape; alone, with their daughter, in black and white and in color, nude and clothed, distant and close. He tried several technical experiments — double and triple exposure, blurs, large and small format film.
 
Sarah Greenough in her analysis of Harry Callahan, talk of his early life photographing his wife Eleanor…

“Yet it was with his series of photographs of Eleanor, more than with any other subject, that Callahan most fully learned what it meant to see photographically. Although he had photographed her intermittently before, beginning in 1947 he photographed Eleanor extensively for more than a decade and during that time she was central not only to his emotional, physical, and spiritual life, but also to his artistic development. He recorded her, as he recalls, "In an endless number of ways": nude and clothed; in parks, streets, and city squares; on the beach, in the water, in tents, and in the woods; in the privacy of their home – their ballroom studio or their bedroom – and the homes of relatives; in this country and in Europe; with their daughter Barbara or alone…"  (Wikipedia)

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Written by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb_thumb_Today I want to share some thoughts about our blind spots and cultural stereotypes. Sometimes it takes an insider to understand and capture the real community that exists; one that outsiders do not or can not understand.

I think about my time in the Boy Scouts while growing up. I belonged to Boy Scout Troop 426 in Downey, California. I joined this troop with about a dozen or so guys that I had gone to school with, played baseball with during the summers, and been in the Cub Scout Pack at my elementary school. In short, these are guys that I had spent about a half dozen years during the prime of my life to that point. The camaraderie that we experienced would be hard to explain to an outsider. We each knew each other and our strengths and weaknesses. These came into play as we challenged the forces of nature, whether it be rain, desert, or mountains. When we were the first group to blaze the trail that later became one of the major scout hikes in the Los Angeles area, we worked together as a team. Outsiders did not understand, including our parents. Unfortunately, I don’t have any photographs of that experience, but those photographs could have helped to capture the moment.

I have tried to relate a story along a similar line to you below about a photographer, Shelby Lee Adams, who grew up in the Appalachian mountains and captured this special culture on film. I hope that you will enjoy this presentation and that it will open your eyes to a different view of these mountain people. I will come back to this work in a future post. Enjoy… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1491 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Appalachia:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/appalachian.html ]

    

“I’ve never set out consciously to write American music. I don’t know what that would be unless the obvious Appalachian folk references.”
— Carlisle Floyd

“Some people want to call me an Appalachian writer, even though I know some people use regional labels to belittle.”
— Robert Morgan

“Daddy was real gentle with kids. That’s why I expected so much out of marriage, figuring that all men should be steady and pleasant.”
— Loretta Lynn

 “I know there’s some kind of history to mountain music-like it came from Ireland or England or Scotland and we kept up the tradition.”
— Loretta Lynn

“We don’t intend to always keep this necessarily African oriented. Originally I had hoped to have African American Indian of this area, and the Appalachian of this area, but at the same time, just as we have the Haitian room, we will always have room for another exhibit.”
— Katherine Dunham

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

JerryPhotoOn this last day of the year we want to offer some suggestions for taking digital (or film) pictures of significant events on New Year’s morning, such as taking in a parade, like the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. Since these are a one time opportunity for photographing the parade, you need to be prepared, both mentally and equipment-wise. We present both general tips and some specific tips for your convenience. Have a great day watching history go by with each float, band, equestrian group, or other participant.

Even though you may not be a professional photographer, you, too, can obtain memorable images at any parades that will be viewed tomorrow. Some of the key things to remember include: You will get one (and only one) chance to get shots of any float, equestrian unit, or band unless there is a halt to the parade’s progress and you will be surrounded by a crowd. So you need to be ready to shot for each unit and you need to select a location that will not be blocked.

This necessitates planning to pick a good position, selecting the correct lenses, and know the order that the floats, bands and equestrian groups ahead of time. Street corners are usually good, especially if the parade must turn around that corner. Get there early; this may mean the afternoon before to get in front. If you are using a camera with an interchangeable lens, don’t plan on changing lenses! Use multiple camera bodies if you want more than one lens will be needed (one for a telephoto lens & another for a wide angle lens). Extra batteries and empty storage cards (digital cameras) or extra film.

Finally, shot a lot! Remember, only a few images out of every 100. By being well-prepared and shooting a lot should will yield rich results. Good luck!

So, let’s look at some of these techniques…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2111 Words ]
    

   

Quotations Related to PARADE

“Leadership involves finding a parade and getting in front of it.”
— John Naisbitt

“And when it rains on your parade, look up rather than down. Without the rain, there would be no rainbow.”
— G. K. Chesterton

“Campaign behavior for wives: Always be on time. Do as little talking as humanly possible. Lean back in the parade car so everybody can see the president.”
— Eleanor Roosevelt

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

JerryPhotoToday we are looking at the type of photographs you might be taking on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. These photos will typically be taken in available light of the streets or the poor photographic lighting of a living room, but may also be supplemented with the use of flash. In any case, you will probably want to use a tripod, since you will need longer exposures on all but the top-of-the-class SLR (Single Lens Reflect) cameras. We hope that these tips will help you capture some great photos!

Taking those candid pictures of family, friends, and holiday play, especially for the kids, is not as easy as it might appears. Sometimes using the flash will be distracting. A flash might also be an obstacle to getting a good picture; people often move before the flash fires, especially if you have your camera set for a “Rear Curtin” flash. So, you may want to try “available light” shooting.

To accomplish this, you need to focus on the ISO settings and you MUST use a tripod to eliminate any movement, You will also want to use a remote “trigger” if one is available for your camera. If such a device is not available, you can use the timed trigger built into most modern digital cameras. For the ISO settings, check my blog article in the References section.

So let’s get on with our exploration…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2372 Words ]

   

Quotations Related to PHOTOGRAPHY

“Photography is the beauty of life, captured.”
— Tara Chisholm

“I didn’t choose photography. Photography chose me.”
— Gerardo Suter

“Imagine a world without photography, one could only imagine.”
— Berenice Abbott

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

JerryPhotoMy experiences in using my cameras has taught me that there is a lot to be learned beyond setting the proper exposure (f-stop, shutter speed, and ISO) or the details of compositions. With the modern digital cameras, the former can be taken care of by using the Automatic settings. The latter takes a lot more study, but you can get a pleasing composition by making sure that everyone you want to capture is within the view.

The two things that everyone needs to attend to include a sharp focus and you hold the camera steady while shooting. The former is usually taken care of by the camera if we let it finish the process before taking the picture. The latter requires a little more work. It’s tempting to hold the camera at arms length when taking the picture; this adds a lot of movement and produces “fuzzy” photos. Use a tripod, if possible, but if not, take a deep breath, hold it, and hold your elbows to your ribs. This will help steady the camera and increase the probability of getting a good shot.

But, remember, you will probably only get one or two great photos from each 50+ shot. Acceptable scrapbook photos are more numerous. But by observing some of the suggestions in this post can improve your odds. So try the techniques out and take lots of pictures. Some of these shots are a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

So, let’s move on…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2691 Words ]

   

Quotations Related to PHOTOS

“As an avid photographer, I also took advantage of the latest technology in photography – digital photography – to post photos on my website on a daily basis.”
— Tipper Gore

“In twenty years you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked.”
— Mary Schmich

“My first calendar was a combination of photos taken from different shoots including golf and casual.”
— Natalie Gulbis

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 Yesterday we examined the Cyanotype printing-out paper that created beautiful blue images from contact prints from negatives or photograms of objects placed upon its surface. These prints required ultraviolet (UV) light of the sun. The image is “developed” by washing in water followed by toning (optional).

Today we examine another type of non-silver printing-out paper that uses a different iron-based sensitizer to coat fiber paper, the Van Dyke Brown process. This color was first developed by the painter, van Dyck, and used by many of the Flemish painters. The beautiful brown image produced on this paper is exposed with UV light (the sun) just like the Cyanotype. The processing of the image on the paper involves a water wash followed by a “fixing” bath to remove excess sensitized compounds followed be a long (30+ minutes) bath.

These images, as will be seen by some of the samples included below, are stunning and durable. They can be toned to bring out some additional tonality. This is a process that requires patience and practice to master, but results in stunning images.  GLB

    

“The darkroom is just the means to an end.”
— Kim Weston

“I’ve been a photographer all these years… I haven’t been in my own darkroom for 10 years.”
— Graham Nash

“My lifestyle is bizarre, but the only thing you need to know is where the darkroom is.”
— Robert Mapplethorpe

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