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Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.

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Archive for June, 2010
by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that crusader for the adoption of the Constitution and writer of the Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 6 of 10. ]

[ 3392 Words ]

    

“Since its founding in 1854, Penn State has proven to be a leading institution of higher learning.”
— Tim Holden

“The fact is, almost every year since the founding of these United States, our government has lived beyond its means.”
— Paul Gillmor

“The Founding Fathers gave the free press the protection it must have to bare the secrets of government and inform the people.”
— Hugo Black

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 One of the jewels of the National Parks Service is Yosemite National Park. While most people think about the Yosemite Valley with its glorious peaks and remarkable water falls, the park actually takes in a far larger area. It includes many zones and features, including glaciers.

The park features several rivers and types of wildlife. It has been a site for the photographers since the time of Carlton Watkins started to record by mammoth-plate camera in the late 19th century through the remarkable photographic prints of Ansel Adams. It is a wonder to behold on a photograph, but even more striking when experienced in person.

Fortunately, President Lincoln took time in the middle of our nation’s Civil War to sign legislation setting aside some of the valley for posterity. Later, a more extensive area was made into a National Park which preserves this unique nature preserve for generations to come. And we have John Muir, that Scottish immigrant to thank for much of that.

So take some time to read over this over and then visit a gallery or museum with exhibits of Yosemite images.  GLB

[  2510 Words ]

    

“A lot of people think that when you have grand scenery, such as you have in Yosemite, that photography must be easy.”
— Galen Rowell

“Yosemite Valley, to me, is always a sunrise, a glitter of green and golden wonder in a vast edifice of stone and space.”
— Ansel Adams

“Yosemite Valley, to me, is always a sunrise, a glitter of green and golden wonder in a vast edifice of stone and space.”
— Ansel Adams

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that great diplomat and future President, John Adams.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 5 of 10. ]

[ 3037 Words ]

    

“Our Founding Fathers would be proud of all that America has achieved, and will continue to achieve, in the coming years.”
— John Linder

“Second, marriage is an issue that our Founding Fathers wisely left to the states.”
— Judy Biggert

“Our political differences, now matter how sharply they are debated, are really quite narrow in comparison to the remarkably durable national consensus on our founding convictions.”
— John McCain

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 Too often we think of fighting a war in times past much like we fought World War II or Vietnam or in the Middle East. Soldiers were drawn from the population (of males, at least until recently) by either the draft or through volunteers. But in the Revolutionary War, men were the fighters and were often accompanied by their wives who performed domestic and nursing chores about the camp.

Molly Pitcher was more than that. In the first place, she was given her name because during one particularly hot and long battle, men were passing out due to the heat. Molly took a bucket, filled it with stream water, and provided it to the men on the artillery line. And when her husband was injured, she took the gun’s ram and proceeded to complete the day by performing his duties.

Such persons often go unrecognized because they are women and/or their tasks seem menial. But, as they say, an army travels on its stomach, and during the Revolutionary War those meals were often provided by the women who accompanied their husbands to the encampments.  GLB

[ 1869 Words ]

    

“Concentrated serum albumin fractionated from blood plasma was effective in battlefield treatment of shock.”
— Paul D. Boyer

“Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war.”
— Otto von Bismarck

“Beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and devil are fighting there, and the battlefield is the heart of man.”
— Fyodor Dostoevsky

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that great propagandist and pamphleteer who made critical contributions in communicating the goals of the revolution to the general populace — Thomas Paine.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 4 of 10. ]

[ 3055 Words ]

    

“In the summer of 1776 our Founding Fathers sought to secure our independence and the liberties that remain the foundation of our nation today.”
— Doc Hastings

“Maintaining checks and balances on the power of the Judiciary Branch and the other two branches is vital to keep the form of government set up by our Founding Fathers.”
— Todd Tiahrt

“Most Americans aren’t the sort of citizens the Founding Fathers expected; they are contented serfs. Far from being active critics of government, they assume that its might makes it right.”
— Joseph Sobran

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 When our nation first gained their independence from British rule, the original thirteen colonies became states under the Articles of Confederation. This organization created a very weak central authority with no taxing powers or capability to maintain a standing military.

This organization marginally worked during the Revolutionary War, but became ineffective thereafter. Each state operated as a relatively autonomous unit, being under the banner of “United” States only for international recognition. On a practical level, it was not working. Therefore, a convention was called to revise these Articles.

The Philadelphia Convention (Constitutional Convention) met in Philadelphia to work on these revisions. In the view of most delegates, it was felt that no amount of revision would be able to make the Articles work; therefore, this group proceeded to work on a new constitution. Progress on the bulk of the items went relatively smoothly, but the issue of representation in the congress threatened to “scuttle” the whole convention.

It remained for the patriarchal Founding Father, Benjamin Franklin, to help mold a compromise. Read on to examine how a compromise was worked.  GLB

[ 2464 Words ]

    

“A constitution that is made for all nations is made for none.”
— Joseph de Maistre

“I believe I am strengthening the Constitution with my case.”
— Michael Newdow

“I believe realism is nothing but an analysis of reality. Film scripts have a synthetical constitution.”
— Manuel Puig

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. Today we will examine the contributions of that great orator and one of the primary advocates for a “Bill of Rights” to be included in the U.S. Constitution.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 3 of 10. ]

[ 2788 Words ]

    

“I see happiness as a by-product. I don’t think you can pursue happiness. I think that phrase is one of the very few mistakes the Founding Fathers made.”
— James Hillman

“I was on a founding members of the Canadian theatre movement in the late 60’s till the mid 70’s and performed theatre from Halifax to Vancouver and all places in between.”
— Nick Mancuso

“In another situation, and in an active station in life, I should have been keenly occupied, and the founding of an order would have never come into my head.”
— Adam Weihaupt

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 Wars often serve as the stage on which young men and women can exhibit great bravery, great valor, and great sacrifice. For those who exhibit exceptional feats of bravery and clear-thinking in the face of great adversity and at great threat to their own safety, there is a special medal — the Medal of Honor. At our local Riverside National Cemetery, there is a memorial to those brave men and women.

Today, we focus upon one of those men, a Navy SEAL, Lt. Michael P. Murphy. He put himself in harm’s way during one battle in Afghanistan. He put himself in a clearing to call in for evacuation of his SEAL team that had come under fire by the Taliban by locating in an open area to complete the call for help.

In Lt. Murphy’s life we should remember all those brave men and women who have taken the same steps to help save and protect the men under their command. Thank you.  GLB

[ 2354 Words ]

    

“Physical bravery is an animal instinct; moral bravery is much higher and truer courage.”
— Wendell Phillips

“Loyalty and devotion lead to bravery. Bravery leads to the spirit of self-sacrifice. The spirit of self-sacrifice creates trust in the power of love.”
— Morihei Ueshiba

“Many have left their families to defend our freedom. We salute their bravery; we express our appreciation and support to their families. And we pray for their safe return.”
— Bob Taft

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July American Independence Day festivities, we believe that this is a good time to reflect on how and why we became a new nation over two hundred years ago. To a great extent, it had to do with the abuses of the British colonial system AND the presence at that point in time of great men of vision — the Founding Fathers.

Last year we posted an extensive series on the American Revolution. We will draw upon some of those posts again this year, but with more emphasis on the specific roles selected Founding Fathers played in the quest for independence. But to get our exploration started, we need to look at the philosophical underpinnings and writings that fueled the American Revolution occurred.

We hope that you will follow us through this exploration and come out with a renewed respect for our great struggle in those years in the 18th century. GLB

[ This is Part 2 of 10. ]

[ 2243 Words ]

    

“Government is necessary for our survival. We need government in order to survive. The Founding Fathers created a special place for government. It is called the Constitution.”
— Michael Badnarik

“Hey, our Founding Fathers wore long hair and powdered wigs – I don’t see anybody trying to look like them today, either… But we do look to them as role models.”
— Leigh Steinberg

“I see happiness as a by-product. I don’t think you can pursue happiness. I think that phrase is one of the very few mistakes the Founding Fathers made.”
— James Hillman

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by Gerald Boerner

  

JerryPhoto_8x8_P1010031 During the height of the Cold War, an event that we remember well occurred in the Western sector of Berlin, Germany. After World War II, Germany was divided into four zones, one for each of the Allied nations — United States, Britain, France and the Soviet Union. However, while the former three cooperated with each other and allowed free passage within zones, the Soviet zone was isolated. Complicating all of this was the fact that Berlin, the traditional capital of Germany, was in the Soviet zone!

When this isolation through normal borders proved not effective enough to stop the hemorrhaging of those East Germans into the Western zone, a wall was built to isolate West Berlin. This Berlin Wall, with its mined fields and guard towers, was meant to keep the East Germans inside rather than to prevent the West Germans from entering East Berlin.

When President Kennedy visited Berlin during June, 1963, he uttered those famous words, “Ich bin ein Berliner”.  GLB

[ 2600 Words ]

    

“Things do not happen. Things are made to happen.”
— John F. Kennedy

“Those who dare to fail miserably can achieve greatly.”
— John F. Kennedy

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.”
— John F. Kennedy

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