Skip to content

Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.

Archive

Archive for August, 2011


 

facebook buttonJoin Me on Prof. Boerner’s Exploration Page

 

 

* * * A T T E N T I O N   T O   M Y   R E A D E R S * * *

My postings have been spotty over the last couple of weeks due to medical problems. I appreciate your understanding while I am recovering.

I will be posting less detailed articles except for especially important events. For the next few months, I have started a oral history project. Parts of that history will be posted here.

Thank you for your understanding.

Gerald Boerner

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     

Commentary:

JerryPhotoBuilding on the work of Joseph Niépce, Louis Daguerre developed a photographic process that was capable of capturing reality and saving it as a photograph. In the beginning of the photographic technology, the Daguerreotype was the process of preference for portraits. For the first time the average worker was able to obtain a picture of family members and loved ones without incurring the cost and time it took for a painted portrait.

The industrial revolution produced changes in society that provided the common person with a wage for the first time. These remembrances in the form of daguerreotypes provided a way of documenting peoples’ lives. True, these images were not easy to duplicate (if at all), but they were more than anything that was available to the general population previously.

In addition, there were a handful of daguerreotypists who were able to capture beautiful landscapes. While these latter photographers were not as plentiful as those making portraits, they produced some very memorable images.

This technology lasted from 1839 through the mid-1850s when other technologies became available. None the less, we have Niépce and Daguerre to thank for these amazing images. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2555 Words ]
    

 

Quotations Related to DAGUERREOTYPE:

 

“The first mentioned is the good old daguerreotype, with its perfection, its beauty, its accuracy, and its prompt execution. It has never been excelled by any production of the camera.”
— Abraham Bogardus

“Good artists hate good photographs, where every object on the field is reproduced with wonderful distinctness; but will go into raptures over an under-timed one, in which the high lights break weirdly out from broad masses of shadow; or an over-timed one wherein light and atmosphere have saturated everything to grayness.”
— Harry L.A. Culmer

“They are documents, “family memories”, nothing more. They were made in the days before “artistic photographs,” and “light effects,” and theatrical “posing.” The photographers of daguerreotypes had not yet been classified “artists” sporting the classic floating tie and the rumpled and dirty hair.”
— Peter C. Bunnell

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     

Commentary:

JerryPhotoBuilding on the work of Joseph Niépce, Louis Daguerre developed a photographic process that was capable of capturing reality and saving it as a photograph. In the beginning of the photographic technology, the Daguerreotype was the process of preference for portraits. For the first time the average worker was able to obtain a picture of family members and loved ones without incurring the cost and time it took for a painted portrait.

The industrial revolution produced changes in society that provided the common person with a wage for the first time. These remembrances in the form of daguerreotypes provided a way of documenting peoples’ lives. True, these images were not easy to duplicate (if at all), but they were more than anything that was available to the general population previously.

In addition, there were a handful of daguerreotypists who were able to capture beautiful landscapes. While these latter photographers were not as plentiful as those making portraits, they produced some very memorable images.

This technology lasted from 1839 through the mid-1850s when other technologies became available. None the less, we have Niépce and Daguerre to thank for these amazing images. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2555 Words ]
    

 

Quotations Related to DAGUERREOTYPE:

 

“The first mentioned is the good old daguerreotype, with its perfection, its beauty, its accuracy, and its prompt execution. It has never been excelled by any production of the camera.”
— Abraham Bogardus

“Good artists hate good photographs, where every object on the field is reproduced with wonderful distinctness; but will go into raptures over an under-timed one, in which the high lights break weirdly out from broad masses of shadow; or an over-timed one wherein light and atmosphere have saturated everything to grayness.”
— Harry L.A. Culmer

“They are documents, “family memories”, nothing more. They were made in the days before “artistic photographs,” and “light effects,” and theatrical “posing.” The photographers of daguerreotypes had not yet been classified “artists” sporting the classic floating tie and the rumpled and dirty hair.”
— Peter C. Bunnell

continue reading…