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Archive for March, 2012

Written by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb_thumb_

Welcome, My FB Family…

Warmer night! It was supposed to be in the upper 40s last night and was already 50 degrees when I went to bed at midnight; I woke up this morning to an outside temp of 52, so I don’t know if it got down as low as the weatherman’s crystal ball, I mean, projection model had predicted. I hope that the same does not apply to the high predicted today; an 81 is predicted and I am not ready for higher temps yet!!! Summer will just have to wait as far as I’m concerned.

_Mission Inn_redroofMission Inn: Redroof  (Photo Credit: ©Don O’Neill)

This weekend the temps are supposed to to drop down to the 60s again and a possibility of rain Saturday night. I hope the rain does stay away until the evening, because Grace and I are going to the Downtown Farmer’s Market again, Lord willing and the shuttle comes as requested. It will be interesting to see what they have and an overcast day will be great for photos. We are going to check out a store across from the Mission Inn that handles Don O’Neill’s watercolor prints (postcard size). I love some of the samples that I’ve seen on his web site; O’Neill was a resident of Riverside until he passed in 2008. Many of his paintings are set in and about River City here. Then on to the Mission Inn and especially to the Downtown Public Library. We haven’t been there for many, many years. Again, photo op of Grace in and about the Gazebo from our sister city, Sendai. Looking forward to a great outing…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2263 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Alaska:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/alaska.html ]

    

“America is looking for answers. She’s looking for a new direction; the world is looking for a light. That light can come from America’s great North Star; it can come from Alaska.”
— Sarah Palin

“In one line of his poem he said good fences make good neighbors. I’d like to think that Alaska and British Columbia working together can prove that we can be pretty darned good neighbors without fences.”
— Dan Miller

“A changing environment will affect Alaska more than any other state, because of our location. I’m not one though who would attribute it to being man-made.”
— Sarah Palin

“But again, you know, the views that we’ve expressed are transferring power back from the federal government to the states, giving Alaska an incredible opportunity to expand its economy, especially at a time when our federal government is coming close to bankruptcy.So that is a broad-based appeal. It’s not an extreme view.”
— Joe Miller

    

My Musings of the Day: March 30th…

    

Successful Visit to Goeske Center…

Well, yesterday morning we actually got to the Goeske Center, one of Riverside’s Senior Centers. Shuttle bus was a little late, but it came and we got to the Goeske Center. Grace had called the day before and they told us to go to the main desk and someone on duty would give us a tour of the facility. So we followed those instructions; they gave us a brochure of the facility and activities before going on the tour, which was very interesting. The facility is quite large, has a couple of exercise rooms, a couple of large lobby areas for small groups to assemble, and a number of smaller meeting rooms where classes and other groups can meet. There is even a small computer center with six computers hooked up to the Internet.

Goeske Center_Collage-1

As we were talking to the ladies at the front desk, we found out that the center had lost there computer teacher several months ago. So, what do you suppose that Grace did? Volunteer to teach some classes? NO! She volunteered yours truly! Well, I was handed the form for volunteering and I filled it out. You would have thought that Moses had just walked through the door — LOL! Before we left, I talked with the director of the center about it and looks like a may have yet another thing to do — in my spare time! Between researching material for these FB postings for my dear FB family and writing my blog articles, most of my day is occupied. But, I think that I will be able to work in a morning once a week; it probably will not start until June. I’ll keep you informed on this new activity as it becomes clearer.

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1946 Words ]
    

    
Artist’s Quote of the Day…

Artist: Charles Baudelaire

Quote:
“From that moment onwards, our loathsome society rushed, like Narcissus, to contemplate its trivial image on a metallic plate. A form of lunacy, an extraordinary fanaticism took hold of these new sun-worshippers.”

Short Bio Statement: Charles Baudelaire, a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator; Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=7335

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Baudelaire_cropCharles Pierre Baudelaire (1821 – 1867) was a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator. A controversial figure in his lifetime, Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence. At the same time his works, in particular his book of poetry Les fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), have been acknowledged as classics of French literature.
 
Baudelaire was educated in Lyon, where he was forced to board away from his mother (even during holidays) and accept his stepfather’s rigid methods, which included depriving him of visits home when his grades slipped. He wrote when recalling those times: “A shudder at the grim years of claustration […] the unease of wretched and abandoned childhood, the hatred of tyrannical schoolfellows, and the solitude of the heart.” Baudelaire at fourteen was described by a classmate: “He was much more refined and distinguished than any of our fellow pupils […] we are bound to one another[…] by shared tastes and sympathies, the precocious love of fine works of literature”. Later, he attended the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris. Baudelaire was erratic in his studies, at times diligent, at other times prone to “idleness.”
 
At eighteen, Baudelaire was described as “an exalted character, sometimes full of mysticism, and sometimes full of immorality and cynicism (which were excessive but only verbal).” Upon gaining his degree in 1839, he was undecided about his future. He told his brother “I don’t feel I have a vocation for anything.” His stepfather had in mind a career in law or diplomacy, but instead Baudelaire decided to embark upon a literary career, and for the next two years led an irregular life, socializing with other bohemian artists and writers.
 
Baudelaire began to frequent prostitutes and may have contracted gonorrhea and syphilis during this period. He went to a pharmacist known for venereal disease treatments, on recommendation of his older brother Alphonse, a magistrate. For a while, he took on a prostitute named Sara as his mistress and lived with his brother when his funds were low. His stepfather kept him on a tight allowance which he spent as quickly as he received it. Baudelaire began to run up debts, mostly for clothes. His stepfather demanded an accounting and wrote to Alphonse: “The moment has come when something must be done to save your brother from absolute perdition.” In the hope of reforming him and making a man of him, his stepfather sent him on a voyage to Calcutta, India in 1841, under the care of a former naval captain. Baudelaire’s mother was distressed both by his poor behavior and by the proposed solution.  (Wikipedia)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1291 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: David Bailey

Quote:
“It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter, because you can invent things. But in photography everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the ordinary.”

Short Bio Statement: David Bailey, an English photographer who helped create the ‘Swinging London’ of the 1960s…

For more information, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bailey_(photographer)

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

David Bailey_PhotographerDavid Royston Bailey CBE (born 2 January 1938) is an English photographer. Bailey developed a love of natural history, and this led him into photography. Suffering from undiagnosed dyslexia, he experienced problems at school. He attended a private school, Clark’s College in Ilford, where he says they taught him less than the more basic council school. As well as dyslexia he also has the motor skill disorder dyspraxia.

In 1959 he became a photographic assistant at the John French studio, and in May 1960, he was a photographer for John Cole’s Studio Five before being contracted as a fashion photographer for British Vogue magazine later that year. He also undertook a large amount of freelance work.
 
Along with Terence Donovan and Brian Duffy, he captured and helped create the ‘Swinging London’ of the 1960s: a culture of high fashion and celebrity chic. The three photographers socialized with actors, musicians and royalty, and found themselves elevated to celebrity status. Together, they were the first real celebrity photographers, named by Norman Parkinson as "the Black Trinity".
 
The film Blowup (1966), directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, concerns the work and sexual habits of a London fashion photographer played by David Hemmings and is largely based on Bailey.
 
The "Swinging London" scene was aptly reflected in his Box of Pin-Ups (1964): a box of poster-prints of 1960s celebrities and socialites including Terence Stamp, The Beatles, Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, PJ Proby, Cecil Beaton, Rudolf Nureyev, Andy Warhol and notorious East End gangsters the Kray twins.
 
The box was an unusual and unique commercial release, and it reflected the changing status of the photographer that one could sell a collection of prints in this way. (The strong objection to the presence of the Krays on the part of fellow photographer Lord Snowdon was the major reason no American edition of the "Box" ever appeared, nor a British second edition issued.) The record sale for a copy of ‘Box of Pin-Ups’ is reported as "north of £20,000".
 
Bailey’s ascent at Vogue was meteoric. Within months he was shooting covers and at the height of his productivity he shot 800 pages of Vogue editorial in one year. Penelope Tree, a former girlfriend, described him as "the king lion on the Savannah: incredibly attractive, with a dangerous vibe. He was the electricity, the brightest, most powerful, most talented, most energetic force at the magazine".
 
American Vogue’s creative director Grace Coddington, then a model herself said "It was the Sixties, it was a raving time, and Bailey was unbelievably good-looking. He was everything that you wanted him to be – like the Beatles but accessible – and when he went on the market everyone went in. We were all killing ourselves to be his model, although he hooked up with Jean Shrimpton pretty quickly".  (Wikipedia)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1094 Words ]
    

    

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Paul Strand

Quote:
“Honesty no less than intensity of vision is the prerequisite of a living expression. This means a real respect for the thing in front of… the photographer… this is accomplished without tricks of process or manipulation through the use of straight photographic methods…”

Short Bio Statement: Paul Strand, an American photographer and filmmaker who helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=2329

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Paul Strand PortraitPaul Strand was an American photographer and filmmaker who, along with fellow modernist photographers like Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston, helped establish photography as an art form in the 20th century. His diverse body of work, spanning six decades, covers numerous genres and subjects throughout the Americas, Europe and Africa.
 
Born in New York City to Bohemian parents, in his late teens Strand was a student of renowned documentary photographer Lewis Hine at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. It was while on a fieldtrip in this class that Strand first visited the 291 art gallery – operated by Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – where exhibitions of work by forward-thinking modernist photographers and painters would move Strand to take his photographic hobby more seriously. Stieglitz would later promote Strand’s work in the 291 gallery itself, in his photography publication Camera Work, and in his artwork in the Hieninglatzing studio.

Some of this early work, like the well-known "Wall Street," experimented with formal abstractions (influencing, among others, Edward Hopper and his idiosyncratic urban vision). Other of Strand’s works reflect his interest in using the camera as a tool for social reform. He was one of the founders of the Photo League, an association of photographers who advocated using their art to promote social and political causes.  (Wikipedia)

Strand subsequently traveled to Mexico, where he photographed the landscape, architecture, folk art, and people and in 1934 produced a film about fishermen for the Mexican government. Thirteen years earlier he had collaborated with Charles Sheeler on a film, Manhatta, a study of the urban high-rise environment. Having returned to New York late in 1934, Strand devoted his energies to theater and filmmaking cooperatives.

In 1943 Strand resumed his still photography, focusing on the people and surroundings of New England. In the early 1950s he moved to Europe, spending six weeks in the northern Italian agrarian community of Luzzara and later traveling to the Outer Hebrides, islands off the northwest coast of Scotland. He traveled and photographed in North and West Africa in the 1960s.  (Getty Museum)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb[2]Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

[ 1293 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Sebastião Salgado

Quote:
“Most of the information we now get is through television and is mutilated. Photography offers the opportunity to spend much more time on a topic. It’s relatively cheaper medium, and can allow a photographer really to live in another place, show another reality, get closer to the truth.”

Short Bio Statement: Sebastião Salgado, a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=3474

Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Sebastião Salgado is a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist. It’s not just that this celebrated Brazilian photojournalist has been sniffling since he arrived in the city, explaining: “I was born in a tropical ecosystem. I’m not used to these plants.” It’s also that he peppers his description of the city with words like strange and crazy, noting that he was mesmerized by the sight of the endless stream of automobile traffic as his plane made its descent.

After a somewhat itinerant childhood, Salgado initially trained as an economist, earning a master’s degree in economics from the University of São Paulo in Brazil. He began work as an economist for the International Coffee Organization, often traveling to Africa on missions for the World Bank, when he first started seriously taking photographs. He travelled often to Africa on missions affiliated with the World Bank. It was then that he first began taking his first photographs. On his return to London these images began to preoccupy him, and he abandoned his career as an economist. At the beginning of 1973 he and his wife returned to Paris so that he could begin his life as a photographer.

Salgado initially worked with the Paris based agency Gamma, but in 1979 he joined the international cooperative of photographers Magnum Photos. He left Magnum in 1994 and formed his own agency, Amazonas Images, in Paris to represent his work. He is particularly noted for his social documentary photography of workers in less developed nations. Longtime gallery director Hal Gould considers Salgado to be the most important photographer of the early century, and gave him his first show in the United States.

Salgado works on long term, self-assigned projects many of which have been published as books: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers, and Migrations. The latter two are mammoth collections with hundreds of images each from all around the world. His most famous pictures are of a gold mine in Brazil called Serra Pelada. He is presently working on a project called Genesis, photographing the landscape, flora and fauna of places on earth that have not been taken over by man.

In September and October 2007, Salgado displayed his photographs of coffee workers from India, Guatemala, Ethiopia and Brazil at the Brazilian Embassy in London. The aim of the project was to raise public awareness of the origins of the popular drink. (Wikipedia)

continue reading…

Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1159 Words ]
    

    

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Harry Callahan

Quote:     
“I do believe strongly in photography and hope by following it intuitively that when the photographs are looked at they will touch the spirit in people.”

Short Bio Statement: Harry Callahan, an American photographer who is considered one of the great innovators of modern American photography…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=5445

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Harry Morey Callahan (1912 – 1999) was an American photographer who is considered one of the great innovators of modern American photography. He was born in Detroit, Michigan and started photographing in 1938 as an autodidact. By 1946, he was appointed by László Moholy-Nagy to teach photography at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Callahan retired in 1977, at which time he was teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design.
 
Callahan left almost no written records–no diaries, letters, scrapbooks or teaching notes. His technical photographic method was to go out almost every morning, walk the city he lived in and take numerous pictures. He then spent almost every afternoon making proof prints of that day’s best negatives. Yet, for all his photographic activity, Callahan, at his own estimation, produced no more than half a dozen final images a year.
 
He photographed his wife, Eleanor, and daughter, Barbara, and the streets, scenes and buildings of cities where he lived, showing a strong sense of line and form, and light and darkness. He also worked with multiple exposures. Callahan’s work was a deeply personal response to his own life. He was well known to encourage his students to turn their cameras on their lives, and he led by example. Callahan photographed his wife over a period of fifteen years, as his prime subject. Eleanor was essential to his art from 1947 to 1960. He photographed her everywhere – at home, in the city streets, in the landscape; alone, with their daughter, in black and white and in color, nude and clothed, distant and close. He tried several technical experiments — double and triple exposure, blurs, large and small format film.
 
Sarah Greenough in her analysis of Harry Callahan, talk of his early life photographing his wife Eleanor…

“Yet it was with his series of photographs of Eleanor, more than with any other subject, that Callahan most fully learned what it meant to see photographically. Although he had photographed her intermittently before, beginning in 1947 he photographed Eleanor extensively for more than a decade and during that time she was central not only to his emotional, physical, and spiritual life, but also to his artistic development. He recorded her, as he recalls, "In an endless number of ways": nude and clothed; in parks, streets, and city squares; on the beach, in the water, in tents, and in the woods; in the privacy of their home – their ballroom studio or their bedroom – and the homes of relatives; in this country and in Europe; with their daughter Barbara or alone…"  (Wikipedia)

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb

Another day has dawned. On this day, we witnessed a couple events surrounding World War I. Before the entry of U.S. troops into that conflict, we witnessed development of two support units for General Pershing’s expeditionary force seeking the Mexican raiders led by Pancho Villa. Following World War I, this day, in the U.S. Senate, witnessed the second attempt to gain ratification of the Treaty of Versailles was defeated led by Republican forces under the leadership of Henry Cabot Lodge. This marked not only a defeat of the program of President Woodrow Wilson, but also a repudiation of the U.S. as a active participant in the international community of nations.

Bantam-jeep-1

This day also witness the manufacture of the one millionth Jeep, that ubiquitous army vehicle, to the U.S. Army. More recently, this day witnessed the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom in the second Persian Gulf War. On the lighter side, this was a day of two major firsts for television: the first Academy Awards Ceremony, hosted by Bob Hope, televised live and later this day would witness the first televising of the day-to-day business of our Congress on C-SPAN. That was this day in history, the 19th of March…

    
A More Detailed Look at Today’s Event History:

The major events of the day took place just before and just after World War I. Prior to that world conflict, taking place mainly in western Europe, we were, in 1916, embroiled in a conflict along the southern borders of the U.S. between Texas and Arizona. Pancho Villa, leading an army of Mexican peasants, would raid towns across the U.S.–Mexico border. One of the most famous of these raids was on the border town of Columbus, New Mexico; during this raid the town was burned to the ground. General John "Black Jack" Pershing and his expeditionary force received orders to pursue and capture and/or kill Pancho Villa. Two new military groups participated in this campaign of the Mexican American War. These two new support units were the motorized cavalry under Lt. George Patton and the founding of the first U.S. air combat force, the First Aero Squadron, based in Columbus, New Mexico; this town was the site of one of Pancho Villa’s more famous border raids. The Aero Squadron served primarily scouting duties during this campaign. They would serve well over France in the conflict taking Place over France.

1st_aero

Following the end of the First World War in 1919, the United States, England and France would draft the formal treaty that the Germans were forced to sign. This document, the Treaty of Versailles, called for the formation of a League of Nations after the model set forth by Woodrow Wilson in his 14 Points. This treaty was designed to protect and expand the colonial empires of England and France under the guise of create "Protectorates" overseen by each of these powers. The U.S. also received some protectorates, especially in the Pacific, but we were not at that time a colonial power.

The problem, however, was this treaty required ratification by the U.S. Senate, which was in control of anti-Wilson Republicans led by men like Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. The latter was especially active, in 1920, when this treaty came up for ratification a second time. This Senate action marked not only a defeat of the program of President Woodrow Wilson, but also a repudiation of the U.S. as a active participant in the international community of nations. We would never formally join the League of Nations and we would suffer, along with the democratic countries of Europe, the pains of war again when Adolf Hitler came into power as German Chancellor in 1933.

Two additional military events celebrated milestones on this day as well. In 1952, during the Korean War, the one millionth Jeep was manufactured. The jeep was introduced as an all-purpose, all-terrain vehicle to provide our troops with mobility during World War II and the Korean War. This milestone in the manufacturing of the functional, no-frills vehicle was a celebration of the success of a concept — mobility on the battlefield.

More recently, we witnessed on this day in 2003, the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom by President George W. Bush. This operation was part of the second Persian Gulf War and part of the U.S. war on terrorism following the attacks of 9-11 in New York City, Pennsylvania, and the Pentagon in Virginia. Unlike the first Persian Gulf War, this military action was basically an U.S. action with a loose coalition of western European allies, especially the United Kingdom. Also, unlike the first Persian Gulf War, there was no coalition or support by our friends in the Arab world. While successful in removing Saddam Hussein from power, it has not bring real brought democracy or real freedom to that troubled country.

USMC_469

We also witnessed a couple of firsts in the television arena. In 1953, we witnessed the first live showing of the annual Academy Awards show. This 25th edition of the awards ceremony was hosted for the first time by Bob Hope and was the occasion of Cecil B. DeMilles winning the Best Picture award for "The Greatest Show on Earth." The ceremony was broadcast by NBC Television. Also on this day, in 1979, the country witnessed the first live broadcast of the day-to-day activities of the U.S. House of Representatives; these broadcasts were carried by C-SPAN.

And that was this day in history. It was filled with several significant events that have shaped and molded this great country of ours!

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1574 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Woodrow Wilson:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/w/woodrow_wilson.html ]

    

“A conservative is a man who just sits and thinks, mostly sits.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“A conservative is someone who makes no changes and consults his grandmother when in doubt.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“Absolute identity with one’s cause is the first and great condition of successful leadership.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“A little group of willful men, representing no opinion but their own, have rendered the great government of the United States helpless and contemptible.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“America lives in the heart of every man everywhere who wishes to find a region where he will be free to work out his destiny as he chooses.”
— Woodrow Wilson

“America was established not to create wealth but to realize a vision, to realize an ideal – to discover and maintain liberty among men.”
— Woodrow Wilson

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThis day, we celebrate the death of St. Patrick who brought Christianity to the Emerald Isle, Ireland. We celebrate this event by parades, wearing of the green and drinking green beer while eating corned beef & cabbage. This day also witnessed one of the first victories of the American patriots against the British in the Battle of Dorchester Heights where Col. Henry Knox performed his seemingly miraculous feat of moving cannons and powder from the captured Fort Ticonderoga to Boston almost overnight. The British, when confronted with these armaments, withdrew from Boston to New York.

The_first_meeting_of_the_Israeli_3rd_government

This was also a day of several naval accomplishments in submarine warfare; the first practical submarine (USS Holland) was launched on this day and the first of a new class (USS Skate) broke through the North Pole’s Ice Pack. It was also the day that saw the launch, by NASA, of the Vanguard 1 solar-powered satellite. In addition, Theodore Roosevelt recognized the effectiveness of investigative journalism by the "Muckrakers" in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington, D.C. Finally, this day witnessed the assumption of the position of Prime Minister by Golda Meir in Israel, the first woman in such a position in the world. So, let’s see these events in a little more detail…

History Details…

Irish_cloverOf course, the most notable event of today is the celebration of St. Patrick’s Day. How did this become a much-celebrated holiday? By the dispersion, borne of necessity, of the Irish around the world. But a substantial of that number settled in New York City and Boston. This day, the celebration of the death of the fabled saint in 461, St. Patrick, who ministered to the needs of the Irish for three decades in the fifth century. It is said that on this day, everyone is an Irishman!

At the beginning the Revolutionary War, the American patriots set up their lines on the high ground of Dorchester Heights in 1776. The problem, the British not only had greater numbers of trained troops, but they also had artillery. The American troops couldn’t compete with these cannons! One of the leaders of the patriots, in addition to Benedict Arnold, there was Col. Henry Knox who suggested that the cannons at Fort Ticonderoga could be captured and brought back to Cambridge to help the colonist soldiers defend the city of Boston. He led an expedition that easily captured the fort and brought back those cannons and powder to Boston. The British awoke to see lines of cannons facing them. The British would withdraw from Boston to New York City. This was the first victory for the Colonists; the British would defeat General George Washington in the Battle of New York shortly thereafter. The ability of the American soldiers to stand up against their British overlords was verified. The rebellion would continue!

Siege of boston artillery

On this day in 1969, the world witnessed the first woman assume the top position in a democratic country, Israel. On this date, Mrs. Golda Meir would assume the position of Prime Minister of Israel and lead the country through some turbulent times. She would distinguish herself in that position and take her seat among the family of nations. She was well prepared for the responsibilities to guide this small country surrounded by nations that wanted to wipe her little nation off the map. But, because of her leadership skills, they would not be able to wipe out Israel. Our country has had a pro-Israel position since the small country emerged following a United Nations resolution that established the nation within the Arab-dominated land of Palestine; Israel would become a haven for those Jews dislocated by the Nazis during World War II and SURVIVED the death camps! Hooray for Israel, and hooray for the female leadership of that feisty little nation that, like the scorpion, is small but has a big stinger.

TheJungleSinclair

In 1906, Theodore Roosevelt described for the first time the investigative journalist. These journalist, the "muckrakers," sought to reveal in the press the excesses of the "robber barons" of the day. This group included Ida M. Tarbell ("The History of Standard Oil"), Lincoln Steffens ("The Shame of Minneapolis") and Ray Stannard Baker ("The Right to Work"), simultaneously published famous works in that single issue (see Wikipedia article); Upton Sinclare (The Jungle) exposed the excessive abuses in the meat-packing industry. This group also included some of the major newspaper publishers of the day who used these stories to increase advertising and circulation revenues; included in this group of publishers were Edwin Lawrence Godkin of the New York Evening Post, Joseph Pulitzer (after whom the annual prize is named) of the New York World, and William Randolph Hearst of the San Francisco Examiner. Yellow Journalism is still alive and well, just watch your evening news!

The U.S. Navy celebrates two events in the submarine warfare department on this day during the past 100+ years. In 1898, the first practical submarine (actually the third one built) commissioned by the U.S. Navy; the USS Holland would complete its first trials on this day. In 1959, the U.S. Navy launched the USS Skate, the first of a new class of nuclear submarines that would be deployed during the Cold War. The Skate was the first to make the voyage across the Atlantic underwater and the first submarine to break through the polar ice cap at the North Pole. This submarine class was a major advance over the original Nautilus launched a few years before. It would be succeeded by the Polaris class of nuclear missile subs launched later.

USS_Skate_(SSN-578)_surfaced_in_Arctic_-_1959

NASA, in 1958, launches the Vanguard 1 solar-powered satellite, the third to be launched by the United States. This satellite is still in orbit, although no longer functional, having completed its mission years ago. It was designed to test a new launch vehicle and to test the environmental effects of space on an artificial satellite. We had moved from responding to the Soviet launch of Sputnik I in 1957 to a programmed of planned space exploration that would reach its pinnacle in the first walk on the moon during the Apollo 11 flight in 1969, just eleven years after the launch of Vanguard 1!

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1814 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Saint Patrick:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/s/saint_patrick.html ]

    

“Christ beside me, Christ before me, Christ behind me, Christ within me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me.”
— Saint Patrick

“I am Patrick, a sinner, most uncultivated and least of all the faithful and despised in the eyes of many.”
— Saint Patrick

“If I be worthy, I live for my God to teach the heathen, even though they may despise me.”
— Saint Patrick

“If I have any worth, it is to live my life for God so as to teach these peoples; even though some of them still look down on me.”
— Saint Patrick

“The Lord opened the understanding of my unbelieving heart, so that I should recall my sins.”
— Saint Patrick

“Before I was humiliated I was like a stone that lies in deep mud, and he who is mighty came and in his compassion raised me up and exalted me very high and placed me on the top of the wall.”
— Saint Patrick

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbAfter looking back at the importance of books, it is interesting to look at the various events that have occurred on this day in history. This was the day that witnessed the publication of that great American novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter. It was also a great day in the history of space travel and exploration, witnessing the launch of the first liquid-fueled rocket by Robert Goddard, the "Father of Modern Rocketry." It was also the day, thirty-five years later, that honored that pioneer in rocketry with the naming of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. It also marked the first American visit to the Soviet’s Mir Space Station by Astronaut Norman Thagard.

West Point, NY_US Military Academy

The U.S. Military Academy (West Point) was founded on this day while we also learned about the first major atrocity of the Vietnam War, the My Lai Massacre, led by Lt. William Calley who was convicted of murdering 22 civilians, but served less than four years for his offense; this was a miscarriage of justice! Finally, this day witnessed the announcement that Robert Kennedy would run for the U.S. Presidency only to be assassinated after winning the California primary less than three months later. This day was also marked the day that former Italian Prime Minister, Aldo Moro, was kidnapped by members of the Red Brigades; he would be found dead 55 days later after the Italian government refused to negotiate with the kidnappers. So this was quite an eventful day…

Hester_Prynne

On this day in 1802, the U.S. Congress founded the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. This academy would be used to train potential young officers in military science. Some of the outstanding graduates included Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, George Armstrong Custer, Jefferson Davis, Douglas MacArthur, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. This was, indeed, a watch list of our greatest generals. To set this event into a historical perspective, this academy was established just a year before Thomas Jefferson commissioned Lewis & Clark to explore the western lands along the Missouri River. It was also two years before the Louisiana Purchase of lands west of the Mississippi River to the boundaries of the Spanish holdings in North America. These two events would be linked together during the settlement of those western lands following the Civil War.

On this day in 1850, that great American novelist, Nathaniel Hawthorne, published the novel, The Scarlet Letter. This novel was based upon the male-centered, religiously bigoted society of the Massachusetts Colony. It portrayed the harsh treatment of a young woman who was considered immoral and who refused to identify her companion. Ironically, but not unexpectedly, the male companion was one of the religious leaders of the colony who failed to admit to his misdeed! So much has not changed in society since then, hasn’t it?

This was a great day for the "Father of Modern Rocketry," the American physicist Robert Goddard. In 1926 he launched his first liquid-fueled rocket. This rocket technology would be used by the great German rocket scientist, Wehrner von Braun, and later American rocket scientist, especially those at the fledgling California Institute of Technology, Cal Tech. In 1961, exactly 35 years after Goddard’s first successful rocket launch, the new NASA research facility, the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, was named in Goddard’s honor. Ultimately, through Goddard’s research, the development of the V-2 rocket by von Braun, and the work of the Cal Tech researchers, the United States would launch its first successful satellite in the early 1958 to recover from the embarrassment from the Soviet’s launch of Sputnik I in 1957. We started to recover from the embarrassment of the Soviet’s space first.

Kennedy_brosThis was also a day of shame on several fronts. On this day, in 1968, Senator Robert Kennedy announced that he would run for the U.S. Presidency for the Democratic Party. Less than three months later, Kennedy would be killed by the assassin Shirhan Shirhan in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles after finding out that he had won the California primary election. This was a sad day for the Kennedy family and a sad day for the American people.

Also, on this day in 1968, the worse atrocity of the Vietnam War would occur at Mỹ Lai. Several hundred unarmed civilians by a platoon of soldiers led by Lt. William Calley. The Mỹ Lai Massacre would be covered up for about a year and a half later; Calley would be convicted of killing twenty-two civilians, but would only serve less than four years. This was not justice!

On this day, in 1978, the former Prime Minister of Italy, Aldo Moro, was kidnapped by terrorist from the Red Brigade and held for ransom. When the Italian government refused to negotiate for Moro’s release, his body was found fifty-five days later. This was the beginning of a wave of terror in Italy and other parts of Europe.

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1501 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Robert F. Kennedy:

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“I believe that, as long as there is plenty, poverty is evil.”
— Robert Kennedy

“Now I can go back to being ruthless again.”
— Robert Kennedy

“One-fifth of the people are against everything all the time.”
— Robert Kennedy

“Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.”
— Robert Kennedy

“I was the seventh of nine children. When you come from that far down you have to struggle to survive.”
— Robert Kennedy

“All of us might wish at times that we lived in a more tranquil world, but we don’t. And if our times are difficult and perplexing, so are they challenging and filled with opportunity.”
— Robert Kennedy

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumb

Again, this day was filled with some pretty important, or at least interesting, historical event in history. One, the assassination of Julius Caesar on the steps of the theatre in Pompeii gave us the famous phrase, "Beware the Ides of March." In the past century, the 20th century, witnessed some important international activities. These included the pursuit of the Mexican leader, Pancho Villa, by General John J. Pershing just before our involvement in World War I, the abdication of Czar Nicolas II (the last Russian Emperor) under the pressures of striking workers and military troops, and the chartering of the American Legion by Congressional action to honor World War I veterans.

Columbus NM

Several events in the entertainment industry also occurred on this day. Julie Andrews and Rex Harrison opened the Broadway version of the Lerner-Lowe musical, "My Fair Lady." Actress Elizabeth Taylor married actor Richard Burton after their steamy affair on the set of "Night of the Iguana" filmed in Mexico; this would be their first marriage to each other. And who can forget that haunting movie, "The Godfather," directed by Francis Ford Coppola? This latter movie won the Academy Award. So, let’s get on with a little closer look at some of these events.

Again, this day was filled with some pretty important, or at least interesting, historical event in history. One, the assassination of Julius Caesar on the steps of the theatre in Pompeii gave us the famous phrase, "Beware the Ides of March." In the past century, the 20th century, witnessed some important international activities. These included the pursuit of the Mexican leader, Pancho Villa, by General John J. Pershing just before our involvement in World War I, the abdication of Czar Nicolas II (the last Russian Emperor) under the pressures of striking workers and military troops, and the chartering of the American Legion by Congressional action to honor World War I veterans.

Soldiers Outside Winter PalaceSeveral events in the entertainment industry also occurred on this day. Julie Andrews and Rex Harrison opened the Broadway version of the Lerner-Lowe musical, "My Fair Lady." Actress Elizabeth Taylor married actor Richard Burton after their steamy affair on the set of "Night of the Iguana" filmed in Mexico; this would be their first marriage to each other. And who can forget that haunting movie, "The Godfather," directed by Francis Ford Coppola? This latter movie won the Academy Award. So, let’s get on with a little closer look at some of these events…

On this day, in 44 B.C., the Roman Emperor for Life, Julius Caesar, was accosted by 60 Senators on the steps of the Pompeii theatre. These Senators were upset at the Imperial ambitions of Julius Caesar that the Senators feared would result in the abandonment of the Roman Republic and the Roman Senate. The Senators, led by Marcus Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus, would take turns stabbing Caesar. This event was foretold by a seer when he told Julius Caesar to "beware the Ides of March." The Ides of March referred to the 15th day of March, May, July, and October; it referred to the 13th day of the other months on the Roman calendar. So the "Ides of March" has become an ominous day for all of us!

Three important international events happened on this day during the 20th century. In 1916, before the U.S. entered the fighting in Europe during World War I, General John J. Pershing lead an army expeditionary force chased Pancho Villa and his Mexican band into Mexico. Among his troops were George Patton, a lieutenant, who would become one of the great Generals of World War II, lead a group of Dodge autos, one of the first armored groups to fight. What triggered this "Border War?" The paramilitary forces of Pancho Villa had attacked the border town of Columbus, New Mexico. Pershing’s Expedition was tasked with pursuing Villa into Mexico to eliminate him, with prejudice, and stop his raiding. It was a fight that prepared the U.S. Army for its activation and deployment to Europe in 1917 to fight in World War I.

Another international event was the end of the czar’s reign over the Russian Empire in 1917. Czar Nicholas II would abdicate and he and his family would be placed in custody by the revolutionaries. The last of the Romanov dynasty would end up executed as the Bolsheviks under the leadership of Lenin took control the country and established the first communist state. What triggered this discontent? Russia’s participation in World War I against the Germans. The Russian people, basically little more than slaves, were inducted into the army and forced to fight in the cold of the Russian winter. The Bolsheviks offered these soldiers an alternative that appealed to this underclass.

My_fair_lady_posterThe third international event took place in 1919. The Congress chartered a new veterans organization, the American Legion, at the bequest of veterans returning from World War I in Europe. Among this group of veterans was the hero of the "Fighting 69th" battle in France and future head of the Office of Strategic Services (the predecessor of the CIA), "Wild Bill" Donovan, the "Father of American Intelligence." He was also a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. The American Legion would serve the needs of the fighting men returning to civilian life after being exposed to the expanded experience of France and the horrors of war.

There were a trio of entertainment events also occurred on this day. In 1956, we witnessed the opening of the Lerner & Lowe musical, "My Fair Lady," starring Julie Andrews and Rex Harrison; these roles were played by Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison in the movie version years later. In 1964, we witnessed actress Elizabeth Taylor marry actor Richard Burton for the first of their marriages to each other; this marriage followed their steamy romance while on the set of "Night of the Iguana" in Mexico. And, in 1972, we saw the Academy Award-winning movie of the Corleone family in "The Godfather," adapted from the book by Mario Puzo released in the theaters across the country; the movie was directed by Francis Ford Coppola.

The events of the day entertained us, warned us, and made us sad. We live in a complex world that could well heed that warning of the seer so many years ago: "Beware the Ides of March!" Let us heed that warning…

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1634 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Revolution:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/revolution.html ]

    

“Whoever finishes a revolution only halfway, digs his own grave.”
— Georg Buchner

“Revolution begins with the self, in the self.”
— Toni Cade Bambara

“We’re still in the first minutes of the first day of the Internet revolution.”
— Scott Cook

“And you cannot have a socialist revolution commandeered from the top, ordered around by some omniscient leader or group of leaders.”
— Ernest Mandel

“The Framers of the Constitution knew that free speech is the friend of change and revolution. But they also knew that it is always the deadliest enemy of tyranny.”
— Hugo Black

“We have confirmed something we only knew in theory, namely that revolution, in which uncontrolled and uncontrollable forces operate imperiously, is blind and destructive, grandiose and cruel.”
— Frederica Montseny

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