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Tag: American Civil War

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumbThe Battle of Chattanooga, TN, was critically important for the Union forces in the West during the American Civil  War. The North had just been defeated at the Battle of Chickamauga. Chattanooga was the key access point to the deep South, having a major railroad switching hub for the railroads. The Battle of Chattanooga started on this day in 1863. It was actually a series of battles, the most notable were the Battle of Lookout Mountain and the Battle of Lookout Ridge. The defeat of the Confederate Army of Tennessee set the stage for some of the most memorable campaigns of the Civil War.

The rail yards in Chattanooga became the supply staging area to support Sherman’s campaign in Georgia. It also allowed the Union troops to cut off forces in the deep South for the remainder of the war. If the results of the battle had resulted in a different result, who knows what the eventual outcome would be.

Chattanooga_region_panorama_Battles_and_Leaders

While most people are more familiar with other Civil War battles, the Battle of Chattanooga was important in isolating one area of the South and supplying one of the final major campaigns by the Union Army. Yes, we remember the Battle of Shiloh, with its bloody loss of life. We have also, no doubt, heard of Sherman’s March to the Sea across Georgia and the Burning of Atlanta. But this Tennessee confrontation between the two sides did much to hasten the end of the war.

Let’s get on with our exploration of the Battle of Chattanooga and it’s results upon the American Civil War… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4083 Words ]
    

         

Quotations Related to Abraham Lincoln:

    

“A friend is one who has the same enemies as you have.”
— Abraham Lincoln

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.”
— Abraham Lincoln

“A woman is the only thing I am afraid of that I know will not hurt me.”
— Abraham Lincoln

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThe Buffalo Soldiers were groups of African American cavalry fighters during the post-Civil War battles on the western frontier against the Native American tribes who were the original resident of this land. The African American 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. They were formed by order of the governor and fought valiantly during the Civil War. The movie, Glory, was based upon this unit’s experiences. They had to overcome the prejudges of the time to serve their country in its time of need.

Robert_Gould_Shaw_Memorial_-_detail

What did it for a black man to become a soldier. The backing of abolitionists like Frederick Douglass. It also took the backing of the new president, Abraham Lincoln. It paved the way for another African American regiment, the 1st South Carolina Volunteers (Union) composed of freed slaves, to fight valiantly for the Union cause. Of course, the battle for equality in the military would be an upward battle, but they would eventually integrated into the military with the signature of President Harry Truman in 1948 of Executive Order 8802. The rest, as they say, is History!

But, it is once again time to explore this remarkable unit and its contributions to the Union victory in the American Civil War… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3954 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Volunteers:

    

“If every American donated five hours a week, it would equal the labor of 20 million full-time volunteers.”
— Whoopi Goldberg

“In addition to serving overseas, the Peace Corps’ Crisis Corps Volunteers have helped their fellow Americans.”
— Solomon Ortiz

“Friendship is but another name for an alliance with the follies and the misfortunes of others. Our own share of miseries is sufficient: why enter then as volunteers into those of another?”
— Thomas Jefferson

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbWhile the American Civil War was not a foreign war, it was of special significance to our nation. Foreign countries, notably Britain, were interested in supporting the Confederate States of America since it was a rich source of cotton and tobacco for Britain’s industrial machine. The Civil War ended up being the bloodiest wars in which our country has fought. It often pitted brother against brother or father against son; loyalties within families were often split.

Using naval blockades of ports, scorched-earth tactics, and the industrial strength of the Union, the General Robert E. Lee was forced to surrender in Appomattox Court House in 1865. General Ulysses S. Grant showed the courtesy of a gentleman and brother to the defeated soldiers. He provided them an honorable process. The nation had to be healed and revenge was not the path to reconciliation.

Dead Union soldier civil war

While the end of the war resulted in the assassination of President Lincoln, the formation of the KKK, and, in the west, marauding bands of ex-confederate soldiers, our country grew back together. It is too bad that the factions within our Congress and many state legislatures, such as California’s, will not take the lesson of the Civil War to hart — we are all Americans and we must get along with one another! Perhaps it’s not too late to see the reconciliation of the conservative Republicans and the liberal Democrats. Our country needs an operational set of government institutions, not ones dominated by ideology to the exclusion of progress.

So it is time, once again, to get on with our exploration of the key events leading us into Civil War. After all, it was this war that first led to the honoring of our fallen sons on the field of battle… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3351 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Veterans Day:

    

“If the Confederacy falls, there should be written on its tombstone: Died of a Theory.”
— Jefferson Davis

“Gen. Grant habitually wears an expression as if he had determined to drive his head through a brick wall and was about to do it.”
— A Union Soldier

“…arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction.”
— Abraham Lincoln

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

     
Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3856 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

     

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

[ Part 2 of 2 — Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3 ]

    

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3760 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     
Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

[ Part 1 of 2 — Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3 ]
    

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3775 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2977 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3619 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3714 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

    
Commentary:

JerryPhotoIn 1864 Gen. Robert E. Lee of the Confederacy and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant of the Union were meeting in another battlefield encounter. This time it was at Cold Harbor at the beginning of June during Grant’s Overland Campaign in region around the Confederate capitol in Richmond, Virginia. This running battle peaked on June 3rd in the Battle of Cold Harbor, generally designated as the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. Grant’s forces held their positions in the hope of outlasting their Confederate adversaries.

Grant’s strategy did not work in this battle. But this ended up being the last major Confederate victory of the Civil War. After this defeat, Grant took a more aggressive approach to future battles. This resulted in the strategic victories at Gettysburg at the beginning of July and Sherman’s March to the Sea through Atlanta. This change in tactics enabled Lincoln’s successful campaign for a second term and the eventual surrender of Lee at Appomattox Courthouse.

Battle_of_Cold_Harbor

“Grant said of the battle in his memoirs, ‘I have always regretted that the last assault at Cold Harbor was ever made. … No advantage whatever was gained to compensate for the heavy loss we sustained.’ The armies confronted each other on these lines until the night of June 12, when Grant again advanced by his left flank, …” (Wikipedia)

Let’s get started on today’s exploration of the Battle of Cold Harbor…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4051 Words ]
    

   

Quotations Related to BATTLEFIELD:

    

“I have traveled a long road from the battlefield to the peace table.”
— Moshe Dayan

“No study is possible on the battlefield.”
— Ferdinand Foch

“The dominant feeling of the battlefield is loneliness.”
— William J. Slim

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