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Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.

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Tag: Antarctica

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumbFew accomplishments capture the imagination more than that of the New Zealander, Edmund Hillary, when he successfully reached the summit of Mt. Everest, the tallest point on earth in 1953. He and his Nepali sherpa climbing companion, Tenzing Norgay, successfully reached that fabled summit and were at the top of the world! The next most famous event was the discovery of both the North and South Poles earlier in the 20th century.

Terra_nova_hut_inside

The race to the South Pole by was ultimately won in December of 1911 by the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, but another team, lead by Robert Falcon Scott would reach it in January of 1912. Neither of these men would make the return trip alive. During the International Geophysical Year of 1958, Sir Edmund Hillary led a group of explorers on the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition on a trek across Antarctica in commemoration of the feat of those two earlier heroes. Ironically, this was the same year that saw the Russians launch the first man-made satellite. Sputnik I, into space, heating up the cold war and challenging America’s technology leadership in the world.

The Commonwealth represented a coalition of western nations to commemorate mankind’s challenge to nature while the latter event (Sputnik) put the world’s two superpowers on a collision course toward nuclear war. It is interesting to note that the trans-Antarctic expedition was almost as challenging to man in 1958 as it had been to the original explorers in 1911-12. The launch of Sputnik triggered events that eventually led, in 1969, to man taking his first steps on another frontier, the Moon. We are now peacefully sharing the frontiers of space with a joint effort of the international community, not using it for the destruction of mankind.

But, let us now get into an examination of the events that led to man’s search and discovery of the South Pole, as commemorated by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4063 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Sir Edmund Hillary (Antarctica):

    

“It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves.”
— Edmund Hillary

“There is precious little in civilization to appeal to a Yeti.”
— Edmund Hillary

“People do not decide to become extraordinary. They decide to accomplish extraordinary things.”
— Edmund Hillary

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

JerryPhotoThe early 20th century was a time of innovation and discovery. History records the Wright Brothers first flight, Ford’s Model T from an assembly line, new weapons of warfare, and, oh yeah, the exploration of the last frontiers on our planet — the North Pole, the South Pole, and the dark continent of Africa. We explore the quest of the South Pole today. It was not to require only navigational skill, but these explorers were confronted by the elements of nature, such as winds, extreme cold, and unpredictable snow packs. They faced not a land mass, but a continent with a “frosting” of glacial ice!.

Scott_memorial_bintonThe discovery of Antarctica and the South Pole captured the energies of the adventurers: Ernest Shackleton, Roald Amundsen, and Robert Falcon Scott. The latter is the focus of this blog posting.

Scott was not the first explorer to reach the South Pole. Amundsen beat him on that front. But Scott’s team did reach the pole. And they met the same fate on their return trip. In fact, they discovered the last camp of the Amundsen expedition before they too met their fate. It is a cruel and hard world out their!

So, let’s get on with our own journey of exploration…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3740 Words ]
    

   

Quotations Related to ROBERT FALCON SCOTT:

    

“Slowly but surely the sea is freezing over.”
— Robert Falcon Scott

“We are very near the end, but have not and will not lose our good cheer.”
— Robert Falcon Scott

“The dog lives for the day, the hour, even the moment.”
— Robert Falcon Scott

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary

JerryPhotoThe nineteenth century was a time of discovery in literature, the arts, science and the new lands of the polar areas. In 1820, a seal hunting expedition under Captain Nathaniel Palmer. The rough seas of the southern polar area along with fog, freezing cold, and ice made the waters unfriendly. These several expeditions of the 19th century set the stage for the more extensive expeditions of the 20th century that culminated with the locating of the South Pole.

Some of these 20th century expeditions, most notably the Shackleton group, were severely tested and resulted in extensive loss of life. The present day outposts on Antarctica belie this long history of danger, hardship, and death. Today’s post is a closer look at that first sighting of Antarctica. Join us for that exploration.  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1887 Words ]

   

Quotations Related to ANTARCTICA

“Sea ice conditions have remained stable in Antarctica generally.”
— Ian Allison

“If I had not some strength of will I would make a first class drunkard.”
— Ernest Shackleton

“After months of want and hunger, we suddenly found ourselves able to have meals fit for the gods, and with appetites the gods might have envied.”
— Ernest Shackleton

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary

Due to injury, this commentary will be added later. Please check back. Thank you.  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2661 Words ]

   

Quotations Related to ANTARCTICA

“Sea ice conditions have remained stable in Antarctica generally.”
— Ian Allison

“A static hero is a public liability. Progress grows out of motion.”
— Richard E. Byrd

“Few men during their lifetime comes anywhere near exhausting the resources dwelling within them. There are deep wells of strength that are never used.”
— Richard E. Byrd

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