Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

    

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

    

[ 1946 Words ]
    

    
Artist’s Quote of the Day…

Artist: Charles Baudelaire

Quote:
“From that moment onwards, our loathsome society rushed, like Narcissus, to contemplate its trivial image on a metallic plate. A form of lunacy, an extraordinary fanaticism took hold of these new sun-worshippers.”

Short Bio Statement: Charles Baudelaire, a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator; Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=7335

    
Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Baudelaire_cropCharles Pierre Baudelaire (1821 – 1867) was a nineteenth-century French poet, critic, and translator. A controversial figure in his lifetime, Baudelaire’s name has become a byword for literary and artistic decadence. At the same time his works, in particular his book of poetry Les fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), have been acknowledged as classics of French literature.
 
Baudelaire was educated in Lyon, where he was forced to board away from his mother (even during holidays) and accept his stepfather’s rigid methods, which included depriving him of visits home when his grades slipped. He wrote when recalling those times: “A shudder at the grim years of claustration […] the unease of wretched and abandoned childhood, the hatred of tyrannical schoolfellows, and the solitude of the heart.” Baudelaire at fourteen was described by a classmate: “He was much more refined and distinguished than any of our fellow pupils […] we are bound to one another[…] by shared tastes and sympathies, the precocious love of fine works of literature”. Later, he attended the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris. Baudelaire was erratic in his studies, at times diligent, at other times prone to “idleness.”
 
At eighteen, Baudelaire was described as “an exalted character, sometimes full of mysticism, and sometimes full of immorality and cynicism (which were excessive but only verbal).” Upon gaining his degree in 1839, he was undecided about his future. He told his brother “I don’t feel I have a vocation for anything.” His stepfather had in mind a career in law or diplomacy, but instead Baudelaire decided to embark upon a literary career, and for the next two years led an irregular life, socializing with other bohemian artists and writers.
 
Baudelaire began to frequent prostitutes and may have contracted gonorrhea and syphilis during this period. He went to a pharmacist known for venereal disease treatments, on recommendation of his older brother Alphonse, a magistrate. For a while, he took on a prostitute named Sara as his mistress and lived with his brother when his funds were low. His stepfather kept him on a tight allowance which he spent as quickly as he received it. Baudelaire began to run up debts, mostly for clothes. His stepfather demanded an accounting and wrote to Alphonse: “The moment has come when something must be done to save your brother from absolute perdition.” In the hope of reforming him and making a man of him, his stepfather sent him on a voyage to Calcutta, India in 1841, under the care of a former naval captain. Baudelaire’s mother was distressed both by his poor behavior and by the proposed solution.  (Wikipedia)

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