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Tag: Korean War

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThis day, March 14th, has seen some important events in the history of our country. During this primary season of the Presidential Election campaign, we hear a lot about Town Hall Meetings and Caucuses; it was on this day that the first town hall meeting was held in Boston. This day witnessed George Washington side-tracking a potential officer coup d’étate by Continental Army officers with his "Newburgh Address." It was also the day that witnessed UN forces retake Seoul during the Korean War. Eli Whitney was granted a patent for his "Cotton Engine" that made the growing of cotton profitable and ultimately triggered the Civil War to maintain access to slave labor. The FBI issued its first "10 Most Wanted" list on this day and Jack Ruby was sentenced to death for the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald. So, let’s take a closer look at some of these events…

faneuil_hall

This day witnessed several major milestones in the history of our American democracy. In 1743, the first recorded town meeting occurred at Faneuil Hall in Boston. Interestingly, this original meeting became the opportunity for the community to become informed about issues rather than to allow the people to vote on issues of current importance as is done with the caucuses being held during this election season, especially in the Republican Party’s primary landscape. On this day, in 1783, just after the signing of the Treaty of Paris, officers of the Continental Army were ready to rebel and take over the fledgling American government over a pension dispute. As they met in Newburgh, they were ready to march on the Congress when George Washington delivered an unscheduled speech that became known as the "Newburgh Declaration." Both of these events would allow our experiment in representative government, unique in the world at that time, that would culminate in the ratification of the strong United States Constitution in 1789. There, again, Washington arose over the populace zeitgeist to insist on a democratic presidency rather than the monarchy that the colonists were used to from their European heritage.

BE030041 (RM) TMH 03/14/2011At the time that the patent for the "Cotton Engine" (Cotton Gin) was issued to Eli Whitney in 1794, the slave-based economy of the southern states was not well understood. Processing cotton, once grown and harvested, was an intensive, difficult job because of all the seeds in the cotton bolls. This was hard, handwork; not the type of work that non-slaves would do! The cotton gin enabled large amounts of cotton to be process, the seeds removed (and themselves processed into oil) and the cotton ready to spin. This made the planting of large fields of cotton economically attractive, but required slave labor to tend, given all the weeding and harvesting required. This made a slave-based economic system emerge as the key factor in the southern states. As the abolition movement in the north gained momentum, the southern states feared the spread of this non-slave economy into the south, destroying their agrarian way of life. The roots of the civil war might actually be traced back to this invention!

In 1951, the Korean War was the major event on most people’s minds. This was the first "hot" conflict in the Cold War between the democratic Western Powers and the communistic Soviet Union. Each of these major powers had their proxy states: the UN and the United States defended South Korea while the communist People’s Republic of China (PRC) supported North Korea; Korea had been partitioned at the 38th parallel after World War II. This conflict seemed to carry on interminably. On this day, the US Forces, under the UN umbrella, launched Operation  Ripper in 1951. This operation would recapture the South Korean capital of Seoul for the second time. The Korean War would continue until 1953 when two major events occurred: Joseph Stalin, the hard-core dictator of the Soviet Union and developer of the communist expansion scheme, died. The second event that brought this war to a armistice was the election, in 1952, of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, leader of the Allies in Europe during World War II, was elected President. The Korean peninsula remains a hotspot in today’s world.

fbi-most-wanted-fbi_gov_1

Two major law enforcement events also occurred on this day. In 1950, J. Edgar Hoover issued the FBI’s first "10 Most Wanted" list. This list identified those fugitives from justice that were considered the greatest threat to society at any moment. It would help promote capture of the FBI’s "toughest guys" by eliciting info from the American people. The second legal event on this day occurred in 1964 when Jack Ruby was sentenced to death for the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the suspected assassin of President John F. Kennedy. A Texas Court of Appeal would overturn the verdict and ordered a new trial. Ruby would die of lung cancer in 1967 while awaiting his new trial.

And now a piece of trivia for the day. Who was the first president to file an income tax return? The answer is Warren G. Harding, president from 1921 to 1923. He was associated with cronies from Ohio who were corrupt; they were convicted and sent to prison! The "Teapot Dome" scandal occurred during his administration and he was known to have at least four affairs during his time in office; Clinton’s indiscretions may not be all that bad! Overall, Harding is considered to be one of the worse presidents that we have had in this country.

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1745 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Jack Ruby:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/jack_ruby.html ]

    

“Maybe something can be saved, something can be done.”
— Jack Ruby

“Someone had to do it. That son of a bitch killed my President.”
— Jack Ruby

“I am as innocent regarding any conspiracy as any of you gentlemen in the room.”
— Jack Ruby

“It may not be too late, whatever happens, if our President, Lyndon Johnson, knew the truth from me. But if I am eliminated, there won’t be any way of knowing.”
— Jack Ruby

“Jackie Kennedy was magnificent in the days and weeks immediately following her husband’s assassination. She was especially wonderful to me.”
— Pierre Salinger

“I have been used for a purpose, and there will be a certain tragic occurrence happening if you don’t take my testimony and somehow vindicate me so my people don’t suffer because of what I have done.”
— Jack Ruby

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThis day was a day of explorations. After the discovery of gold in California in 1948, the world witnessed a massive invasion of men from around the world attempting to find their claim on part of this treasure; these Forty-Niners used whatever transport that was available to reach San Francisco which became a large city almost overnight. We also reacted in awe in 1953 as two British scientists, Watson and Crick, discovered the double-helix structure of the DNA molecule that is the basis of life; they were awarded the Nobel Prize for their discovery. This day also witnessed the awarding of the Congressional Medal of Honor to Airman 1st Class John Levitow in 1969; he was the first Vietnam-era airman to be honored with this award.

Crick

This day also witnessed FDR appointing a woman, Francis Perkins, as Secretary of Labor making her the first woman to serve on the President’s cabinet in 1933. On a sadder note, we watched with horror as the ATF/FBI raid on the Waco, Texas, compound of the Branch Davidian cult in 1993; as the TV camera crews covered the event, fire swept through the compound killing all the members inside.

After watching the men and women of the 4077th Field Hospital play out their sub-dramas and treating the casualties of the Korean War, in 1983 we witnessed the final episode of the TV show, M*A*S*H; the final episode was “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen” and was watched by the largest audience until the most recent Super Bowls. It was a night of television history.

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 889 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to DNA:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/dna.html ]

    

“If you can write DNA, you’re no longer limited to ‘what is’ but to what you could make.”
— Drew Endy

“The O.J. Simpson case, they had no understanding of that DNA evidence, and didn’t want to.”
— Joseph Wambaugh

“It was very interesting for me because DNA made music without much technical knowledge at all.”
— Arto Lindsay

“He told me that Francis Crick and Jim Watson had solved the structure of DNA, so we decided to go across to Cambridge to see it. This was in April of 1953.”
— Sydney Brenner

“Diversity has been written into the DNA of American life; any institution that lacks a rainbow array has come to seem diminished, if not diseased.”
— Joe Klein

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbToday’s events range from the loss of New York City to the British during the American Revolutionary War to the landing of the Marines at Inchon during the Korean War to President George W. Bush naming Osama bin Laden as the prime mover behind the 9-11 Terrorist Attack on the Twin Towers. These are events that we have not previously covered in this blog, as such. But we have written about several other events that occurred on this day.

Butterfield Stage

We have looked at the start of a transcontinental passenger system that preceded the building of the Transcontinental Railroad — the Butterfield Overland Mail Stage. These stages were able to carry passengers in relative comfort, if not luxury between Missouri and San Francisco, California starting in 1958. However, the passenger service was a secondary function of these stages; they were primarily designed for carrying the U.S. Mail between the mid-West and Pacific Coast. It would later compete with the Wells-Fargo Stages for both passenger and freight service. It had a ten year period in which it provided the only comfortable passenger service between the two coasts of this country.

We continued with a look at the beginning of Prohibition that was brought about by the Women’s Christian Temperance League through the ratification of the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act in 1920. This caused tremendous disruption to our country through bootlegging, speak-easies, and the gangster wars of the 1920s. Prohibition was finally ended in 1933 by the 21st Amendment during the first days of FDR’s first administration.

In 1938, big band leader Benny Goodman and his jazz orchestra played a concert in Carnegie Hall in Manhattan just off Central Park in New York City. This was the first jazz performance in this venue and marked the acceptance of this musical genre by the sophisticated culture of highbrow American society. This set the stage for pop music concerts to be staged at this venue that previously had allowed only classical programs.

1954_Corvette

General Motors (GM) introduced a new concept car — the Chevrolet Corvette. This would be the first modern sports car manufactured in this country with its introduction in 1953. While revolutionary for its time, it was equipped with a six cylinder motor, like all Chevys, and a three-speed manual transmission. It would not be equipped with a V-8 engine until 1955. It underwent a major restyling in 1957 and has been manufactured since those early days, providing young teenagers and men going through their “middle-aged crazies” with their dream car in exchange for the family station wagon.

So now we need to proceed to looking at the Notable events occurring on this day… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 933 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Prohibition:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/prohibition.html ]

    

“Prohibition is better than no liquor at all.”
— Will Rogers

“Prohibition has made nothing but trouble.”
— Al Capone

“Once, during Prohibition, I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.”
— W.C. Fields

“Drug prohibition has caused gang warfare and other violent crimes by raising the prices of drugs so much that vicious criminals enter the market to make astronomical profits, and addicts rob and steal to get money to pay the inflated prices for their drugs.”
— Michael Badnarik

“Instead of giving money to found colleges to promote learning, why don’t they pass a constitutional amendment prohibiting anybody from learning anything? If it works as good as the Prohibition one did, why, in five years we would have the smartest race of people on earth.”
— Will Rogers

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThe Korean War if often referred to as the forgotten war. It was technically a police action not a declared war. It was the second battle between the superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, during the Cold War; the first battle was the Berlin Airlift (covered in a previous posting, http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=2443). The superpowers did not fight directly, but they supported smaller states in this proxy war. In this case, it was between North and South Korean, with the Peoples Republic of China supporting the North Koreans and the United Nations supporting the South Koreans.

This was a police action since it was carried out under a resolution of the United Nations Security Council. The resolution was passed when the representative of the Soviet Union withdrew from the session, thus eliminating their veto of the action. The Police action resulted in an agreement after the death of Joseph Stalin.

Korea_DMZ_sentry

The result of three years of conflict, and a high rate of death and injury. Many innovations were developed during this conflict, including the use of jet fighters, helicopters, and field hospitals (MASH units). These would again come into use during the Vietnam Conflict a decade later. It also resulted in a substantial increase in the number of soldiers whose lives were saved, but who lost limbs in the process. This created a high demand for prosthetic limbs, a technology that was only in its infancy prior to the conflict. It also resulted in the development of the Veterans Hospitals to serve these men during their rehabilitation.

But, now, let’s get started on on our brief exploration of the Korean War and its essential battles… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3645 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Veterans Day:

    

“My God, maybe there’s a real war going on!”
— Unknown American Soldier

“We thought the North Koreans would back off once they saw American uniforms.”
— Phil Day, Task Force Smith

“The wrong war, at the wrong place, at the wrong time, and with the wrong enemy.”
— Omar Bradley

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

   

Commentary:

JerryPhotoIn 1944, as World War II was grinding on, The D-Day landings, the Battle of the Bulge, fight for Iwo Jima & Okinawa were ahead and years of fighting were expected, especially in the Pacific Theater. The USS Missouri, the “Mighty Mo”, was launched at the Brooklyn Naval Yard on this day in 1944. This would be the last Battleship to be built in not only the United States, but in the World. This Iowa-class battleships was equipped with 16” guns that could hurl a 2700 lb. shell 20 miles. Sea battles would be fought beyond the horizon!

This ship fought proudly in several wars and serve as the stage for the final surrender of the Japanese to end World War II. It would go on to fight in the Korean War and the Persian Gulf War. It served with distinction throughout these engagements. But there had been changes in naval warfare; the focus had changed from “ships of the line” of the days of the sailing vessels of the 18th and 19th centuries to the dreadnoughts , named after the HMS Dreadnought battleship, of the early 20th century. But during the inter-war years, the large Battleships were shown to be vulnerable to the new airplanes.

USS_Missouri_watching_over_USS_Arizona_-_Pearl_Harbor

Billy Mitchell had demonstrated in the early 1920s that these battleships could be sunk by bombs dropped from the air. This shocked the Naval establishment the viewed the giant gun platforms as the “showcase” ship. The British had the HMS Hood, the Germans had the Bismarck, the Japanese had the Yamamoto, and the U.S. had the Iowa-class ships like the USS Missouri. The aircraft carrier became more important, especially in the Pacific Theater and the efficacy of the submarine was established, especially during the Battle of the Atlantic. These subs would become even more important during the Cold War when they acquired nuclear power and the ability to launch long-range missiles.

But enough context. It’s time to start our exploration of the proud history and record of the USS Missouri…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4184 Words ]
    

   

Quotations Related to BATTLESHIP:

    

“If we had less statesmanship we could get along with fewer battleships.”
— Mark Twain

“He’s going to the battleship? Well, I guess he’s getting mentally ready, huh?.”
— Bernie Bickerstaff

“The Melvin probably was the only destroyer to sink a battleship in World War II.”
— Jack Green

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary

Due to injury, this commentary will be added later. Please check back. Thank you.  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3054 Words ]

   

Quotations Related to VETERANS

“We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.”
— Cynthia Ozick

“It is easy to take liberty for granted, when you have never had it taken from you.”
— Dick Cheney

“This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave.”
— Elmer Davis

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