Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

JerryPhotoOn this last day of the year we want to offer some suggestions for taking digital (or film) pictures of significant events on New Year’s morning, such as taking in a parade, like the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. Since these are a one time opportunity for photographing the parade, you need to be prepared, both mentally and equipment-wise. We present both general tips and some specific tips for your convenience. Have a great day watching history go by with each float, band, equestrian group, or other participant.

Even though you may not be a professional photographer, you, too, can obtain memorable images at any parades that will be viewed tomorrow. Some of the key things to remember include: You will get one (and only one) chance to get shots of any float, equestrian unit, or band unless there is a halt to the parade’s progress and you will be surrounded by a crowd. So you need to be ready to shot for each unit and you need to select a location that will not be blocked.

This necessitates planning to pick a good position, selecting the correct lenses, and know the order that the floats, bands and equestrian groups ahead of time. Street corners are usually good, especially if the parade must turn around that corner. Get there early; this may mean the afternoon before to get in front. If you are using a camera with an interchangeable lens, don’t plan on changing lenses! Use multiple camera bodies if you want more than one lens will be needed (one for a telephoto lens & another for a wide angle lens). Extra batteries and empty storage cards (digital cameras) or extra film.

Finally, shot a lot! Remember, only a few images out of every 100. By being well-prepared and shooting a lot should will yield rich results. Good luck!

So, let’s look at some of these techniques…  GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2010 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2111 Words ]
    

   

Quotations Related to PARADE

“Leadership involves finding a parade and getting in front of it.”
— John Naisbitt

“And when it rains on your parade, look up rather than down. Without the rain, there would be no rainbow.”
— G. K. Chesterton

“Campaign behavior for wives: Always be on time. Do as little talking as humanly possible. Lean back in the parade car so everybody can see the president.”
— Eleanor Roosevelt

continue reading…