Compiled by: Gerald Boerner ( @glbphoto )

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb[2]Welcome to a new feature of my blog universe. For quite a while now, I have been posting a set of “Photographer’s Tips of the Day” on my Prof. Boerner’s Exploration page on Facebook. I wanted to try to share these tips with the followers of my blog and this is the first cut. I would appreciate any feedback that you might want to forward to me via the Comments section; if you are a Facebook user, you may use your Facebook credentials to smooth the process of accessing the comment area of this blog.

Each day I scan a number of photo related pages on Facebook as well as Twitter (my Twitter ID is @glbphoto). I hope that these tips and the “Photographer’s Quote of the Day” will help you in your pursuit of improving your photographic eye and skills. I also try to include one reference to a Museum Blog or Exhibit to help you develop your photographer’s eye. GLB

Copyright©2012 • Gerald L. Boerner • Commercial Rights Reserved

[ 1293 Words ]

    
Photographer’s Quote of the Day…

Photographer: Sebastião Salgado

Quote:
“Most of the information we now get is through television and is mutilated. Photography offers the opportunity to spend much more time on a topic. It’s relatively cheaper medium, and can allow a photographer really to live in another place, show another reality, get closer to the truth.”

Short Bio Statement: Sebastião Salgado, a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist…

For more information, see: http://www.boerner.net/jboerner/?p=3474

Photographer’s Backgrounder:

Sebastião Salgado is a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist. It’s not just that this celebrated Brazilian photojournalist has been sniffling since he arrived in the city, explaining: “I was born in a tropical ecosystem. I’m not used to these plants.” It’s also that he peppers his description of the city with words like strange and crazy, noting that he was mesmerized by the sight of the endless stream of automobile traffic as his plane made its descent.

After a somewhat itinerant childhood, Salgado initially trained as an economist, earning a master’s degree in economics from the University of São Paulo in Brazil. He began work as an economist for the International Coffee Organization, often traveling to Africa on missions for the World Bank, when he first started seriously taking photographs. He travelled often to Africa on missions affiliated with the World Bank. It was then that he first began taking his first photographs. On his return to London these images began to preoccupy him, and he abandoned his career as an economist. At the beginning of 1973 he and his wife returned to Paris so that he could begin his life as a photographer.

Salgado initially worked with the Paris based agency Gamma, but in 1979 he joined the international cooperative of photographers Magnum Photos. He left Magnum in 1994 and formed his own agency, Amazonas Images, in Paris to represent his work. He is particularly noted for his social documentary photography of workers in less developed nations. Longtime gallery director Hal Gould considers Salgado to be the most important photographer of the early century, and gave him his first show in the United States.

Salgado works on long term, self-assigned projects many of which have been published as books: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers, and Migrations. The latter two are mammoth collections with hundreds of images each from all around the world. His most famous pictures are of a gold mine in Brazil called Serra Pelada. He is presently working on a project called Genesis, photographing the landscape, flora and fauna of places on earth that have not been taken over by man.

In September and October 2007, Salgado displayed his photographs of coffee workers from India, Guatemala, Ethiopia and Brazil at the Brazilian Embassy in London. The aim of the project was to raise public awareness of the origins of the popular drink. (Wikipedia)

continue reading…