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Tag: President John F. Kennedy

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThis day, March 14th, has seen some important events in the history of our country. During this primary season of the Presidential Election campaign, we hear a lot about Town Hall Meetings and Caucuses; it was on this day that the first town hall meeting was held in Boston. This day witnessed George Washington side-tracking a potential officer coup d’étate by Continental Army officers with his "Newburgh Address." It was also the day that witnessed UN forces retake Seoul during the Korean War. Eli Whitney was granted a patent for his "Cotton Engine" that made the growing of cotton profitable and ultimately triggered the Civil War to maintain access to slave labor. The FBI issued its first "10 Most Wanted" list on this day and Jack Ruby was sentenced to death for the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald. So, let’s take a closer look at some of these events…

faneuil_hall

This day witnessed several major milestones in the history of our American democracy. In 1743, the first recorded town meeting occurred at Faneuil Hall in Boston. Interestingly, this original meeting became the opportunity for the community to become informed about issues rather than to allow the people to vote on issues of current importance as is done with the caucuses being held during this election season, especially in the Republican Party’s primary landscape. On this day, in 1783, just after the signing of the Treaty of Paris, officers of the Continental Army were ready to rebel and take over the fledgling American government over a pension dispute. As they met in Newburgh, they were ready to march on the Congress when George Washington delivered an unscheduled speech that became known as the "Newburgh Declaration." Both of these events would allow our experiment in representative government, unique in the world at that time, that would culminate in the ratification of the strong United States Constitution in 1789. There, again, Washington arose over the populace zeitgeist to insist on a democratic presidency rather than the monarchy that the colonists were used to from their European heritage.

BE030041 (RM) TMH 03/14/2011At the time that the patent for the "Cotton Engine" (Cotton Gin) was issued to Eli Whitney in 1794, the slave-based economy of the southern states was not well understood. Processing cotton, once grown and harvested, was an intensive, difficult job because of all the seeds in the cotton bolls. This was hard, handwork; not the type of work that non-slaves would do! The cotton gin enabled large amounts of cotton to be process, the seeds removed (and themselves processed into oil) and the cotton ready to spin. This made the planting of large fields of cotton economically attractive, but required slave labor to tend, given all the weeding and harvesting required. This made a slave-based economic system emerge as the key factor in the southern states. As the abolition movement in the north gained momentum, the southern states feared the spread of this non-slave economy into the south, destroying their agrarian way of life. The roots of the civil war might actually be traced back to this invention!

In 1951, the Korean War was the major event on most people’s minds. This was the first "hot" conflict in the Cold War between the democratic Western Powers and the communistic Soviet Union. Each of these major powers had their proxy states: the UN and the United States defended South Korea while the communist People’s Republic of China (PRC) supported North Korea; Korea had been partitioned at the 38th parallel after World War II. This conflict seemed to carry on interminably. On this day, the US Forces, under the UN umbrella, launched Operation  Ripper in 1951. This operation would recapture the South Korean capital of Seoul for the second time. The Korean War would continue until 1953 when two major events occurred: Joseph Stalin, the hard-core dictator of the Soviet Union and developer of the communist expansion scheme, died. The second event that brought this war to a armistice was the election, in 1952, of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, leader of the Allies in Europe during World War II, was elected President. The Korean peninsula remains a hotspot in today’s world.

fbi-most-wanted-fbi_gov_1

Two major law enforcement events also occurred on this day. In 1950, J. Edgar Hoover issued the FBI’s first "10 Most Wanted" list. This list identified those fugitives from justice that were considered the greatest threat to society at any moment. It would help promote capture of the FBI’s "toughest guys" by eliciting info from the American people. The second legal event on this day occurred in 1964 when Jack Ruby was sentenced to death for the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the suspected assassin of President John F. Kennedy. A Texas Court of Appeal would overturn the verdict and ordered a new trial. Ruby would die of lung cancer in 1967 while awaiting his new trial.

And now a piece of trivia for the day. Who was the first president to file an income tax return? The answer is Warren G. Harding, president from 1921 to 1923. He was associated with cronies from Ohio who were corrupt; they were convicted and sent to prison! The "Teapot Dome" scandal occurred during his administration and he was known to have at least four affairs during his time in office; Clinton’s indiscretions may not be all that bad! Overall, Harding is considered to be one of the worse presidents that we have had in this country.

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1745 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Jack Ruby:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/jack_ruby.html ]

    

“Maybe something can be saved, something can be done.”
— Jack Ruby

“Someone had to do it. That son of a bitch killed my President.”
— Jack Ruby

“I am as innocent regarding any conspiracy as any of you gentlemen in the room.”
— Jack Ruby

“It may not be too late, whatever happens, if our President, Lyndon Johnson, knew the truth from me. But if I am eliminated, there won’t be any way of knowing.”
— Jack Ruby

“Jackie Kennedy was magnificent in the days and weeks immediately following her husband’s assassination. She was especially wonderful to me.”
— Pierre Salinger

“I have been used for a purpose, and there will be a certain tragic occurrence happening if you don’t take my testimony and somehow vindicate me so my people don’t suffer because of what I have done.”
— Jack Ruby

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbToday we find a number of significant events in the history of our nation. We also find a couple of major events in the personal lives of a some of our public heroes. And finally, we find a couple events of terrorism in both this country and the United Kingdom. As usual, these events provided a cascade of subsidiary events that helped to create this country as it is now. I hope that we take time on this first day of the new month to contemplate and consider the rich filigree that makes our country a unique blend of peoples, lands, and ideas.

tipislide

In terms of our national history, this day in 1781 found the Articles of Confederation become the first constitution of the new nation forged out of the thirteen American colonies following the Revolutionary War. But the real story is the rich land in which these original colonies, now states, would become a nation of fifty states ranging from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and include the frozen north of Alaska and Pacific paradise of Hawaii. Jefferson started this process with the Louisiana Purchase, but continued to the annexation of the Republic of Texas to the United States in 1845. President Tyler did not acquire this land through treaty, like most of the rest of the west, but through annexation; this did not recognize the right of the Texans to claim that they were legally an independent entity!

This process continued as these lands were explored during the latter part of the 19th century. As the natural beauty of this land became apparent. There was Yellowstone with its geysers, deep canyons, and wildlife. There was the Yosemite Valley in the Sierra-Nevada Mountains in California with its waterfalls and great natural beauty. And, of course, the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River in the Arizona Territory. These natural wonders would be desecrated like the natural wonders of Niagara Falls had been if not protected. This protection was afforded in 1872 by the Yellowstone Act of 1872 signed on this day by President Ulysses S. Grant that would protect the natural wonder that was Yellowstone.

This protection was continued during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt who used his power to designate National Monuments to protect some of the other wonders of the west. This was used to protect the Grand Canyon, Yosemite, and various Indian relics throughout the west. And, of course, these protections were formalized in 1917 when President Woodrow Wilson signed the law that created the National Parks Service. This agency would help protect wild and scenic regions across this great land of ours. Without this protection, we would not be able to look forward to vacations to see these examples of “eye-candy” on our family vacations!

EagleRock

Other significant events on this day included the creation of the Peace Corps in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy by executive order, the kidnapping of the infant son of aviation hero Charles Lindbergh in 1932, and the retirement of Baseball great Mickey Mantle from the New York Yankees in 1969. These events affected us in various ways. The Peace Corps provided an alternative to the “Ugly American” image of many post-war interactions with the third world nation while at the same time providing our young people with an unprecedented opportunity to serve their nation. From this experience, we have reaped many educators, businessmen, and others dedicated to the service of others. The Lindbergh case, the “Crime of the Century,” resulted in a number of laws designed to protect our population, albeit at the expense of the right of many immigrant groups. And we again realized the role of sports heroes in our national life. Mickey Mantle was the personification of the baseball hero who was, indeed, a nice guy. We need more of his kind in our present day atmosphere of greed exhibited by many of our present sports stars.  

We now will proceed to examine some of the events that are associated with day in history... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1382 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Texas:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/texas.html ]

    

“Calling a taxi in Texas is like calling a rabbi in Iraq.”
— Fran Lebowitz

“But I’m a citizen of Texas and try to spend most of my time there.”
— Thomas Haden Church

“I got beat up up in Texas because my bootlaces were the wrong color.”
— Fairuza Balk

“After I left Texas and went to California, I had a hard time getting anyone to play anything that I was writing, so I had to end up playing them myself. And that’s how I ended up just being a saxophone player.”
— Ornette Coleman

“According to a study by Achieve Incorporated, Texas is the first state to make a college-prep curriculum the standard coursework in high school, starting with this year’s ninth grade class.”
— Rick Perry

“All new states are invested, more or less, by a class of noisy, second-rate men who are always in favor of rash and extreme measures, but Texas was absolutely overrun by such men.”
— Sam Houston

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