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Tag: Robert E. Lee

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbToday has been associated with major athletic events, entertainment figures and political figures. It is a day on which several noteworthy events occurred that had an noticeable effect of our present times. Who today would think of watching a film of a press conference? Who would think of a world without women heads of state? Ours is a time of speed and immediacy and the events of this day foreshadowed these times.

Hughes H-1 Racer

As far as the athletic events are concerned, today saw the first bicycle race, Le Tour de France (the Tour de France) in 1903. It is also the day that saw the oldest athletic rivalry start, Brown University vs. Harvard University in Ice Hockey; Brown won that first contest in 1898 by a score of 6-0. More recently, the shot made by a Notre Dame guard went in with less than 30 seconds to go in a game against the John Wooden-led UCLA Bruins; this was the first loss for the Bruins in 88 games, an NCAA Division 1 record.

On this day we also saw Lucille Ball deliver her first son live on TV on the “I Love Lucy” show in 1953. It is also the day that the Hollywood actor, director, industrialist, and aviator, Howard Hughes, set the cross country speed record, covering the distance from Los Angeles to New York City averaging 322 miles per hour in 1937. This broke the previous record set by the famed Aviator, Charles Lindbergh.

This was also the day on which the 18th century Statesman and Orator, Daniel Webster, was born in 1782. He had a significant impact on American politics in the mid-1800s. In 1955, President Dwight D. Eisenhower held the first Presidential Press Conference on live TV; it was also filmed as a precaution of something going wrong. Finally, this day saw the naming Indira Gandhi to be the Prime Minister of India; she was the first woman to hold that position. This is a significant range of events that have had impact on several areas of our lives.

It is interesting looking at the origin of bicycle racing in 1903 in France. Interesting not because it was novel, which it was not, but interesting because of the motivation behind it. The French newspaper, L’Auto, created the Tour de France in order to sell more newspapers. This race would course through most regions of France, which would catch the fancy of Frenchmen everywhere. And once this interest was captured, it was hoped that they would continue to buy the paper to follow the progress of the race. This race is still an exciting and captivating event for us because it represents an extreme, multi-faceted challenge to the cyclists. While the Olympics occur only once every four years, the Tour de France is an annual event.

Carlos_Nehru

The selection of Indira Gandhi to be India’s Prime Minister in 1966 marked a milestone for women in that country of poverty. While India obtained its independence from British rule in 1948, it went through an upheaval while carrying out the partitioning of the country to move the Muslims to the Pakistan state and the Hindus to India. Much conflict arose during this process which has continued to the present day. Gandhi was well-prepared for the task, being the daughter of the former Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and related to Mahatma Gandhi who was instrumental in obtaining independence for his beloved India. She successfully led the country until she was assassinated by Sikh bodyguards in 1984.

So let’s get on with our overview of the events of January 19th… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1146 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Indira Gandhi:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/i/indira_gandhi.html ]

    

“People tend to forget their duties but remember their rights.”
— Indira Gandhi

“One must beware of ministers who can do nothing without money, and those who want to do everything with money.”
— Indira Gandhi

“You must learn to be still in the midst of activity and to be vibrantly alive in repose.”
— Indira Gandhi

“There exists no politician in India daring enough to attempt to explain to the masses that cows can be eaten.”
— Indira Gandhi

“There are two kinds of people, those who do the work and those who take the credit. Try to be in the first group; there is less competition there.”
— Indira Gandhi

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumbOn this day in 1799, on the floor of the United States Congress, Representative Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee III delivered a short Eulogy commemorating the recent death of the Beloved General and President, George Washington. Washington had died on December 14th after a short illness. He is remembered for his wartime exploits as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, the survivor of the terrible winter in Valley Forge, the abortive start-up of this new nation during the Articles of Confederation, and the creation of the United States Constitution. He became the young country’s first President, elected to two terms by unanimous votes of the Electors in each election.

The_Surrender_of_Lord_Cornwallis_at_Yorktown_October_19_1781

But he was responsible, above all, for the creation and formation of this new, novel form of government — a republican democracy. He gave himself unselfishly of himself to each of these assignments, but, above all, he molded the new government by avoiding the pitfalls placed in front of him. He resisted the attempt to make him “King”, as evidenced by his Newburg Address. He forged a government THAT WORKED in the two-party environment not foreseen by the Constitution. And he created a model for the Executive Branch of this new government with his Cabinet of Secretaries, a National Bank, and a powerful centralized government that merged thirteen independent states into one strong national union that preserved certain rights for the states while providing a strong central government with the power to levy taxes and maintain a standing, federal militia. The was a second revolution forged by this leader — George Washington.

After serving two terms as President, he set the precedent of retiring from this position. This would establish the pattern that was followed until the 1930s and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Upon retirement, he gave one of his most stirring speeches, his Farewell Address. He thus retired to his beloved home, Mount Vernon, to become the gentleman-farmer that had been his goal all of his life. However, within two years after his retirement, he awoke sick one morning and passed from this earth.

That was on the 14th; on this day, the 26th of December, his friend, Henry Lee, arose to deliver his short tribute to his long-time friend. And we will never forget those words: “First in War, First in Peace, and First in the Hearts of his Countrymen…” They reflect the sincere feelings of a grateful nation to a man who had helped shape that same nation.

But it is now time for us to proceed with our exploration of the Eulogy of George Washington, Soldier, Statesman, President, and, all above all else, Gentleman… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4552 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Eulogy:

    

“I have no other view than to promote the public good, and am unambitious of honors not founded in the approbation of my Country.”
— George Washington

“I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man.”
— George Washington

“I walk on untrodden ground. There is scarcely any part of my conduct which may not hereafter be drawn into precedent.”
— George Washington

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbWhile the American Civil War was not a foreign war, it was of special significance to our nation. Foreign countries, notably Britain, were interested in supporting the Confederate States of America since it was a rich source of cotton and tobacco for Britain’s industrial machine. The Civil War ended up being the bloodiest wars in which our country has fought. It often pitted brother against brother or father against son; loyalties within families were often split.

Using naval blockades of ports, scorched-earth tactics, and the industrial strength of the Union, the General Robert E. Lee was forced to surrender in Appomattox Court House in 1865. General Ulysses S. Grant showed the courtesy of a gentleman and brother to the defeated soldiers. He provided them an honorable process. The nation had to be healed and revenge was not the path to reconciliation.

Dead Union soldier civil war

While the end of the war resulted in the assassination of President Lincoln, the formation of the KKK, and, in the west, marauding bands of ex-confederate soldiers, our country grew back together. It is too bad that the factions within our Congress and many state legislatures, such as California’s, will not take the lesson of the Civil War to hart — we are all Americans and we must get along with one another! Perhaps it’s not too late to see the reconciliation of the conservative Republicans and the liberal Democrats. Our country needs an operational set of government institutions, not ones dominated by ideology to the exclusion of progress.

So it is time, once again, to get on with our exploration of the key events leading us into Civil War. After all, it was this war that first led to the honoring of our fallen sons on the field of battle… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3351 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Veterans Day:

    

“If the Confederacy falls, there should be written on its tombstone: Died of a Theory.”
— Jefferson Davis

“Gen. Grant habitually wears an expression as if he had determined to drive his head through a brick wall and was about to do it.”
— A Union Soldier

“…arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction.”
— Abraham Lincoln

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

     
Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3856 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

     

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

[ Part 2 of 2 — Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3 ]

    

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3760 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     
Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

[ Part 1 of 2 — Battle of Gettysburg, Day 3 ]
    

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3775 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG

    

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

     

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 2977 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly. GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3619 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly... GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 3285 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…

Edited by Gerald Boerner

 

Commentary:

Commentary will be added shortly… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2011 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 33937 Words ]

 

Quotations Related to GETTYSBURG:

 

“My dead and wounded were nearly as great in number as those still on duty.”
— William C. Oates

“Up, men, and to your posts! Don’t forget today that you are from Old Virginia!”
— George E. Pickett

“It ain’t so hard to get to that ridge – The hell of it is to stay there.”
— Confederate soldier

continue reading…