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Prof. Boerner's Explorations

Thoughts and Essays that explore the world of Technology, Computers, Photography, History and Family.

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Tag: Rock ‘n Roll

Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Commentary:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumbGrowing up in the 1950s put me at the beginning of the rock-n-roll revolution. It was an exciting time since we had the choice between the songs of the big bands, songs by the classical country-western artists, and the new breed of rock and roll artists. Bill Halley and his Comets was among the first of these latter artists. These performers were exciting. They sang songs in stylings that responded to the interests and needs of those entering their teenaged years in the latter 1950s. Among the top stars that we danced to at junior high and high school dances were Buddy Holly and his Crickets, Ritchie Valens, and, of course, “The Big Bopper” himself!

Holly Monument

But we were also a generation that saw some of our biggest heroes lost to accidents and assassination. There was, of course, the assassination of our young, dynamic President, John F. Kennedy. We would lose several to automobile accidents — Patsy Cline and Jane Mansfield. Then there were the (alleged) suicides like that of Marilyn Monroe. And in 1959, there was the event that we look at today — the small plane crash in Iowa that took three of the bright, rising stars of Rock and Roll.

In the cold of winter in the upper mid-west, a small Cessna took off after an evening performance with three of the emerging great idols of the teen generation — Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and “The Big Bopper” J.P. Richardson. I can still remember listening to “Peggy Sue,” “Donna,” “La Bamba,” and “Chantilly Lace” at dances and parties. Those were the songs that captivated our spirits with their catchy rhythms and lyrics. They were also the first of a period of songs that were kept to between two and three minutes so that they could get more air play on the radio. These were the songs that I listened to on KFWB and KRLA.

Without further delay, let’s jump into the exploration of this tragic event and the young artists that we lost on that day… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 4391 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Rock-N-Roll:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/rock-n-roll.html ]

    

“You can’t stop rock-n-roll!”
— Dee Snider

“You know, there have been a lot of casualties in rock-n-roll.”
— Warren Cuccurullo

“Without Elvis none of us could have made it.”
— Buddy Holly

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Edited by Gerald Boerner

    

    
Introductory Comments:

JerryPhoto_thumb2_thumb_thumbThe notable events on this day through history range from those that were informative, propaganda intended to change public opinion to those that highlight greed and avoid conflict leading to war. A couple of days ago, we dealt with the philanthropy of John D. Rockefeller; today we look at how he accumulated his billions of dollars through the monopoly of Standard Oil of Ohio. The 1870s was a time that saw the rich accumulate great sums of money and value through the control of access to this country’s natural resources, like oil, steel, or transportation. It took President Teddy Roosevelt to bust these trusts to restore the resources to the people.

Standard_Oil

On the other hand, we also look at the creation of the League of Nations in 1920 that brought the nations of the world together in a deliberation forum to talk out their differences without resorting to warfare. Good idea, but it didn’t necessary work. Woodrow Wilson, the architect of the Fourteen Points, suffered a stroke and was unable to campaign for the ratification in a Senate dominated by isolationist; the Treaty of Versailles, and therefore, the League of Nations, was not ratified and the United States did not participate. That, combined with the British and French quest for lands in the middle East. So much for a good idea!

Other good ideas did catch on. The Leonardo of America, Benjamin Franklin, start publishing Poor Richard’s Almanack on this day back in 1753. This publication would become the standard reference for farmers of the time, being helpful in knowing when to plant and harvest their crops. Likewise, Thomas Paine started serializing his famous tomb, Common Sense, on this date in 1776; this propaganda document served as a call to arms to the colonists in their battle with the British.

45 rpm record with large center

Finally, a technology innovation was released on this date in 1949 — the 45 rpm record. RCA provided this recording format to replace the 78 rpm record. The 45 allowed two high-quality recordings to be place on the two sides of this disk; it became the iconic mode of distributing songs during the Rock ‘n Roll era of the 1950s and early 1960s. Besides providing a better medium for selling records, it also created the opportunity for selling new record players due to its large central hole. It also made it easier to load more music in juke boxes in vogue during that period. Just like it replaced the 78 records, it was replaced by the 33 1/3 rpm album popular starting in the late 1950s. Ah, yes, those were the days.

So let’s get going on our overview of the significant events on January 10th… GLB

These Introductory Comments are copyrighted:
Copyright©2012 — Gerald Boerner — All Rights Reserved

[ 1048 Words ]
    

    

Quotations Related to Benjamin Franklin:

[ http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/b/benjamin_franklin.html ]

    

“A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.”
— Benjamin Franklin

“A life of leisure and a life of laziness are two things. There will be sleeping enough in the grave.”
— Benjamin Franklin

“A place for everything, everything in its place.”
— Benjamin Franklin

“All mankind is divided into three classes: those that are immovable, those that are movable, and those that move.”
— Benjamin Franklin

“All who think cannot but see there is a sanction like that of religion which binds us in partnership in the serious work of the world.”
— Benjamin Franklin

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